The Best Method for Teaching Asperger's Students

Children with Aspergers and High-Functioning Autism can learn and excel, and if certain teaching methods are used, their progress can be nothing short of fantastic. One of the most important things to realize in making learning fun for Aspergers kids is the fact that they learn in different ways than children without this disorder.

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18 comments:

  1. with my son, if your expectations were low that is all he would give you, but if your expectations were high, he would give you that too...but the key was you couldn't just say it you had to believe it as he knew.

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  2. Every person with Asperger's is different. My best advice to you would be to listen carefully to the parents and to the child him/herself. Keep constant communication between school and home. Educate EVERYONE with whom the child will come in contact, including lunch and recess helpers and administrators. Throw all your assumptions and preconceived notions in the trash and approach this wonderful opportunity with an open mind. Get ready for a GREAT ADVENTURE!

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  3. Communicate with the parents and find out what his sensory issues are, for example; sounds, touch,etc. My son's sensory issues are various sounds. I always communicate to the teacher what signs to watch for if he is starting to be over stimulated such as placing his hand over his ears; this is a great cue to remove him from the situation or to talk to him about what sounds are bothering him, this can help to prevent a melt down. If a meltdown should occur ask the parents does the child like to be touched or not to be touched; my son does not like to be touched, but other children find it comforting. They are highly intelligent and very loving children.

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  4. Provide a place in the classroom where the student fan go to get away from the sensory stimulation (a corner of the room at the back, perhaps. Have noise cancellation headphones. Maybe a bean bag pillow as well. Work with the OT, SLPA, or whomever gives this child pull-out services. Also talk with last year's teacher and definitely talk with the parents and keep that line of communication open.
    58 minutes ago via mobile · Like

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  5. No 2 kids are the same, especially those on the autism spectrum. Things that work with other kids never worked with my son. Ask the parents what type of learner this child is and incorporate that style into your teaching. Listen to what the parents tell you, they are the ones that truly know him/her. I 100% agree with what Steph Gorrell said too. And please please please do NOT expect this child to be a cookie-cutter kid, they have beautiful minds and souls =o)

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  6. I have a 9 year old Asperger student , he is the most interesting kid I have ever taught , brilliant :) . . It takes some time until you get to know him better , be patient and loving

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  7. To me, the biggest thing is to not be afraid of him/her. Our Aspie is a beautiful person who just happens to not socialize well with other children, but responds great to adults, but they are all different. Enjoy their uniqueness and if possible get in touch with the parents early to find out if they know of any strategies that will help. Most parents know their children well enough to give you some tips. For example, my son does better when he has an organized teacher and classroom. Chaos is just confusing. He had a great teacher in 3rd grade, but the classroom was just too colorful and chaotic so he struggled that year. In 4th grade, the room was quieter and more organized, so he did great.

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  8. Enjoy how their minds work, take the time to understand them and be a couple of steps ahead of them. And don't expect him to be just like the other students and not compare him to others.
    38 minutes ago · Like · 1

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  9. i find here in ireland teachers zone out wth aspies but my son has a wonderful teacher who has her faults but we use a notebook where i write what he was like after school and she tells me what he was like in school so we can both help him out......

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  10. "if you've met one child with Aspergers, then you've met one child with Aspergers". Common quote but start there! Yes, take a look at some info about the particulars and symptoms of Aspergers but use that to try to understand why this particular student behaves a particular way. I have met with every one of my sons teachers from kindergarten til now (8th grade!). We discuss general characteristics of Aspergers and I add the, "for instance, my son will....". They have always thanked me for that meeting and said that it was very helpful.

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  11. Children with Aspergers are very unique and intelligent children....these children are different in there own ways. My little brother has aspergers and he is the sweetest kid you will ever meet. There are books you can read to help you deal with a child with aspergers.....they can help alot

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  12. were all different...my sons teacher teaches him the same as all the other kids in the class she just has a great understanding of how he works... sometimes we take more time to do things other times were finished quick and we get board i think time will tell your new student will act go with the flow we are unique and talented....i learn from my little boy everyday its a fun experience to interact with an aspie usually :)

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  13. What a great teacher to think in advance how to reach this student! Consistency and order work well for mine; great comments above. Many are used to so much 1 on 1 that they expect a lot of attention. It might be a good lesson to show that this is not how the world works. Have patience and a fun year!
    22 minutes ago · Like · 1

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  14. i think its great you even asked for advise a lot of teachers wouldnt care enough to do that

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  15. Many teachers approach education trying to shore up the deficit areas - they are wrong. take a child's strengths and expand them and the expansion will reach the deficit and give it the support it needs- while also gently with love helping to make those connections to the weaker areas - it's helpful to shed some light. Truly look for this child's gifts and strengths for the direction on how to nurture him in growth.

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  16. Working with the parents is key. My son is going into the 4th grade and his teacher e-mailed me not only issues that may have been occurring, but a heads up of things coming up and kudos of a job well done. It's imperative to work to mainstream and include the child with the class. They say if you know ONE child with Asperger's, then you know one child. They are not all genius levels and my son, unlike some other Asperger's kiddos is highly social. He does the hand flapping, inappropriate comments and sometimes does not understand personal space or what is appropriate or not. The wonderful thing is, he is always progressing. Look for progress vs. major leaps and changes. Reward good/great behavior/work and work together on issues you will most likely have. Thanks for taking care of another Aspi kiddo. They are special in their own unique way. Remember to promote that. Best wishes to you!!

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  17. work with the class in understanding your Aspie. Not only will they be able to help the community at large, but they will be more understanding of him/her and will be a great advocate for them against possible bullying or misunderstandings with other students/parents/teachers. ALOT of folks don't know about Aspergers....YET! :)

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  18. We have always had a notebook for two-way communication between the teacher or para and me and my ex. It works great to track issues, concerns or GREAT JOBS! So you can discuss/accolade at home too!

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