HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

Education and Counseling for Individuals Affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders

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Working With Your Aspergers Child's School: Developing Inclusive Practice

"What is the best educational setting for an Aspergers child?"

The historical tendency has been for students with learning difficulties like Autism to be segregated from the general classroom and taught in settings like special education or even home schooling. But, because children with Aspergers and High-Functioning Autism have average to above average intelligence, many parents and teachers believe that, with certain adjustments, these children should be included as part of the regular educational process, especially when they reach middle school and beyond.

Such inclusive practices take the commitment of the school system, the teachers, the student and the family to make such a situation work effectively. Teachers need to be taught the value of structured learning with a minimum of abrupt changes, and they may need to understand the best ways the Aspergers student learns. For example, if the child is a visual learner, he or she needs as much opportunity to learn that way as is possible.

The school may need to offer some special tutoring or mentoring to help the Aspergers student keep up with what’s going on in the classes. Classmates may need a short lesson on Aspergers so as to avoid some of the confusion and teasing that can go on when kids don’t understand the nuances of dealing with a peer with such a disorder.

Sometimes the teacher needs to make adjustments, like setting stricter routines in their teaching practices, teaching in different ways, and even making changes in things like the color of ink they use on the overhead projector.

There is much evidence to suggest that children with Aspergers do better in an inclusive program with the right blend of socializing and educational techniques that maximize the learning potential of the child. If your child is a candidate for inclusive practice in education, speak to his/her principal to begin the process of making it happen. 

Teaching Students with Aspergers and HFA

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

That was my dilema this year I have decided on mainstream for my son with the right support in place
Yesterday at 10:52am · Like

Anonymous said...

Its got to be the right school for ur son u will find one have u support I am just in the middle of going for a common assessment framework I am going to appeal for adam to go to a mainstream with autisum unit I have fantastic support from cheshire voice I hope u have support

Anonymous said...

I had my son in a great school, but then moved last year. The middle school here was more geared for low functioning kids than my high functioning son and we decided to home school him. But this coming year I'm looking into having him back in mainstream again. He really needs that socialization.

Anonymous said...

We have had our son in a great school setting but now looking for the right high schoo and having a very hard time!

Anonymous said...

From the article..."Sometimes the teacher needs to make adjustments, like setting stricter routines in their teaching practices, teaching in different ways, and even making changes in things like the color of ink they use on the overhead projector." ALSO the teachers have to understand that just because a child "corrects" them it's not out of malice it's out of how they've learned a particular lesson. My son at the beginning of the school year corrected a teacher on how she pronounced Appalachian..because she had earlier said it one way then the other (Tomato Tomahto kind of thing) She has held that against him all year because he "embarrassed her" in front of the class.

Anonymous said...

We've been there..my son just turned 11,always been mainstream...mostly good experiences,except 4th grade..what a nightmare!!The teacher was INTIMIDATED by him, therefore,was in COMPETITION with my then 8 yr old son all year long! It was very confusing for him!

Anonymous said...

Sometimes the teacher needs to make adjustments, like setting stricter routines in their teaching practices, teaching in different ways, and even making changes in things like the color of ink they use on the overhead projector.

Anonymous said...

My son is in a low student population "project based learning" school. This means he does a lot of work in small groups. 7th grade has been very difficult, but I have noticed he is already learning how to adapt. The teachers are about to go through the ROPES program and will be performing some education around Aspergers for the students when the new school year starts. Because I am so vocal, they often include me as they try new ways to educate the kids and the teachers.

Ilene said...

My son has been in the mainstream education since Kindergarten. He is now in Second grade and we have just gotten the diagnosis. He wants to stay in mainstream classroom, we want him to and the school has assured us that he will be fine. There are actually a couple of other autistic kids in his current class so I think he will be fine.

Anonymous said...

We just got the diagnosis of aspergers. My son attends mainstream classes and has since preschool. Why switch now? As long as he continues to do well and will start getting some social skills help at school which is done in the regular classroom, I think he is fine.

Scissors36 said...

Iam thinking of home schooling my son as he feels so isolated, he has no particular friends as they don't understand him and gets called stupid etc, been in school quite a lot but made no difference, fed up now of him coming home so upset, any advice very welcome, he's now 8.

Tiffany Rezner said...

Parents have to stay involved! My 10 yr old Aspie has been in the same public school since kindergarten and we've only had to file a due process petition once which was directly related to a substitute teacher not being properly trained on how to handle melt downs. I am not saying it has been simple or easy by any means but we as parents have to be advocates for our children to live normal lives and get proper educations. Be present at your children's schools and hold them accountable for following IEP. You may hurt some feelings in the process or step on some toes but at the end of the year my son's teachers have always thanked me for being so involved and communicating often. They will know that it makes their job easier in the end, even if it makes them uncomfortable to begin with.

AS said...

We are planning to move to another school district because of school issue. Not sure how to expect teachers to be more adjusting and more considerate towards the kid as they have another 29 more to take care at the same time. Wish we had more facilities for kids with Asprgers as they can function well in regular classroom and do not need special education. i feel my child is totally lost in this situation where we cannot affort private school and public schools do not provide all the support.

Mark Hutten said...

Comment from Amber: "Really, it depends on what the school-teachers are willing to do and how the child reacts to the environment and stress levels. Some can succeed in a public school setting, others do better in a private school setting (small teacher to child ratio), others do best schooling at home. We chose to school at home with an online public school, several children...so not just him by himself. It's been wonderful for him! Aren't we glad that there are so many education options?!"

Cheshire Cat said...

My son is starting at a private school and will be boarding full time, from September onwards. We chose the school very carefully as our local High schools would not be a good fit for him.
He has an IEP (the new school are aware of this - they also know he has a DCD [Developmental Co-ordination Disorder] diagnosis), however, we haven't yet told them about his recent HFA diagnosis. Nor, for that matter, have we told our son. I'm worried he'll be feel stigmatized and also worried he'll 'use' the HFA diagnosis as a reason as to why not try things/try his best. My question is, should we tell the school? Should we tell him?

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the Aspergers child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

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How to Prevent Meltdowns in Aspergers Children

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and the Asperger’s child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

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Parenting Defiant Aspergers Teens

Although Aspergers is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager with Aspergers are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the Aspergers teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

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Aspergers Children “Block-Out” Their Emotions

Parenting children with Aspergers and HFA can be a daunting task. In layman’s terms, Aspergers is a developmental disability that affects the way children develop and understand the world around them, and is directly linked to their senses and sensory processing. This means they often use certain behaviors to block out their emotions or response to pain.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children With Aspergers Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with Aspergers face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

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Living with an Aspergers Spouse/Partner

Research reveals that the divorce rate for people with Aspergers is around 80%. Why so high!? The answer may be found in how the symptoms of Aspergers affect intimate relationships. People with Aspergers often find it difficult to understand others and express themselves. They may seem to lose interest in people over time, appear aloof, and are often mistaken as self-centered, vain individuals.

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Online Parent Coaching for Parents of Asperger's Children

If you’re the parent of a child with Aspergers or High-Functioning Autism, you know it can be a struggle from time to time. Your child may be experiencing: obsessive routines; problems coping in social situations; intense tantrums and meltdowns; over-sensitivity to sounds, tastes, smells and sights; preoccupation with one subject of interest; and being overwhelmed by even the smallest of changes.

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Unraveling The Mystery Behind Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism

Parents, teachers, and the general public have a lot of misconceptions of Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism. Many myths abound, and the lack of knowledge is both disturbing and harmful to kids and teens who struggle with the disorder.

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Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

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