HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

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Helping Aspergers and HFA Children to Control Their Anger

"I'm in desperate need of some strategies to deal with my Aspergers (high-functioning) son's anger. When he starts to stew about something, it's not long before all hell breaks loose. Any suggestions?!"





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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Christy Holloway Thank you so Much for posting this... I had just made a Post on another page about my 10 yr old son that is starting to experience anger issues.... God Really knew I needed this today!
about an hour ago · Like · 1 person
Judi Bauer Schulte we have a code word for our daughter, she is 9. When we see her getting aggitated we say the word...and she knows to calm her self down.....or to go somewhere to calm down
about an hour ago · Like
Lisa Zahn We are struggling with this so much with our 14-year old son. The teen years have not been easy so far! Thanks so much for your help here. I also needed it this morning, after a rough evening last night.
about an hour ago · Like
Kathy Foster Great article. Do parents seem to see this teype of behavior escalate in the tween/teen years? Thanks for posting this. Our son "gets it" when he is not upset and after the fact but during a melt down... is just not there, yet. age 12 boy.
about an hour ago · Like
Ashley Henderson Gonzales Great article. There is a certain stare and then my son clicks over into his OCD loop or extreme rigid behavior, there is usually not a lot of rationalizing going on at this time. Once he gets in the zone, it is almost as it he needs to come out if it by himself. Something clicks back over and he is out of it.
about an hour ago · Like
Ginny Leigh Gehling This is exactly what i needed thank u

Anonymous said...

The article talks about 'timeouts' we call them 'chill outs' since timeouts are used for consequences. He helped make a chill out list and picks somethings from it when he needs to CHILL OUT!

Anonymous said...

www.myaspergerschild.com is terrific. There's often all the appropriate info at the suggestions of my fingers. Thank you and maintain up the superior work!

Anonymous said...

this is a well-written article with a remarkably respectful, supportive vibe. thank you!

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