HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

Education and Counseling for Individuals Affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders

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5 Online Autism Support Resources For Parents


Raising a child with autism can be a tough but rewarding job. As a parent of a child with autism, you know that teaching certain basic tasks can become challenging, and sometimes, it’s easy to get frustrated with a lack of progress or understanding on your child’s part. We’re here to tell you that you’re not alone, and there are online resources available specifically for parents of autistic children.

These five websites are run by professionals and parents alike and provide support groups, information on the condition, as well as learning tools and other helpful resources. You don’t have to take this journey alone! There are thousands of parents just like you connecting every day that can offer tips, guidance, and support. 

1. Supportiv

When the days become overwhelming and you find yourself full of frustration, sometimes you just need to vent and get it all out. But where do you vent without facing judgment? After all, being a parent of an autistic child carries with it certain (if not unreasonable) expectations like extreme patience. Let’s be honest; we’re all human, and sometimes, things get the better of us.

Supportiv is an online chat and mental health site where you can connect and chat anonymously about pretty much anything that’s on your mind. If you don’t want to turn to friends and family with your frustrations, this option can offer a perfect alternative.

Everything is completely anonymous, and the chat rooms are moderated so you won’t have to worry about facing judgment or cruelty from anyone online. Stressed? Overwhelmed? Tired? Tell us all about it at Supportiv! Connect with others who feel the same way, share stories, and find the support you’re looking for with this growing online community. You can also take a look at the blog for further resources on mental health.

2. AutismBeacon

This autism resource site was started by a parent of an autistic child, so it’s already coming from a place of empathy and understanding. You’ll find resources on sensitive subjects such as bullying and sexuality that are often avoided in other spaces because of their controversial nature; but these are topics that still need to be addressed, even with an autistic child.

The site provides resources for advocacy, awareness, treatment, and more. If you’re a new parent of an autistic child or someone who’s been looking for a larger, more information-rich autism awareness community, you’ve found it! Visit http://autismbeacon.com/home for more information.

3. Autism Speaks

For new parents confused about what autism is, how it affects daily life, and what options are available, there’s Autism Speaks. This website is designed to provide parents with support via an Autism response team to help answer all of your questions, information on providers and treatment options, and even info on autism-friendly events in your area.

This hub of information and resources needs to be in your Bookmarks, as it’s one of the most comprehensive and information-rich sites available on autism. Autism Speaks is an organization that’s dedicated to helping everyday people, parents, educators, and more, better understand autism and eliminate the stigma surrounding the condition.

4. AutismNOW

Autism Now is another awesome online resource for all things related to ASD. With a focus on early detection, early intervention, transitioning, community involvement, and more, Autism Now aims to cover the entire spectrum of obstacles and challenges that come with being a parent of an autistic child.

You can find fact sheets, information on programs, treatment, and providers, an online support community, and more at https://www.autismspeaks.org/. The organization also operates an autism call center in case you have any questions about your child’s condition and how to handle certain obstacles that accompany it.

You can also sign up for one of Autism Now’s webinars on the subject of ASD and navigating its obstacles. You can never learn too much about your child’s condition, after all.

5. TACA

TACA, or The Autism Community In Action, is an organization dedicated to providing support, education, and hope to families living with autism (according to the organization’s own mission statement). With a powerful set of core values and an online community that’s home to thousands of parents, caregivers, and educators, TACA is a must-have resource for families with autistic children.

From online programs and webinars to mentor programs, scholarships, outreach, and more, TACA covers pretty much any obstacles you might encounter during your journey. You don’t have to do it alone; TACA is here to help. Visit https://tacanow.org/ today and take advantage of the site’s many resources.

Conclusion

Luckily for us, the web is home to thousands of resources for parents of autistic children, their caregivers, and educators. The more information we can get out there about ASD and treatment, support, and caregiving options, the more we’ll understand autism and how to navigate it as parents. Don’t wait! Check out one of these five resources today. 

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