HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

Education and Counseling for Individuals Affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders

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Helping Older Aspergers and HFA Teens Find Work

RE: "How can I get my 19-year-old Aspergers son to stop playing video games long enough to go find a job? I try to tell him that he needs to be working at least part-time at this age – but he’s not interested. (*sigh*)"

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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Susie Montz Hrenko Maybe he can get a job at Game Stop or some other video game place? My son is only 8, but I'm thinking it might be a good match because of his video game obsession.
16 hours ago · Like · 4 people
Marlene Biggy whenever I walk into game-stop, I play a mental game of 'find-the-aspie'...... and it never fails, there's ALWAYS a clerk who fits the description, and the one I go to for HONEST answers to my questions :)
16 hours ago · Like · 5 people
Beth Ann Arbogast Best buy is always a good option too
16 hours ago · Like
Alice Unzueta D Ajenjo He maybe could be a teacher and help little kids to learn how to use computers, playgames, etc...
15 hours ago · Like
Lisa Hunter Mears I thought the same thing about Game Stop- a perfect match.
14 hours ago · Like

Shannon Moore said...

I agree with all these comments - Game stores, and for other Aspies: pet stores, book stores, whatever their interest is. They will get to be an expert and they will be taught retail/social scripts that will be invaluable to them to fall back on in life when they need to call banks/doctors/utilities. Tech support is also a great job idea. Ultimately, for someone like this - Video game testing and design could be a lucrative field. Look into classes at the community college (programming, art/design) that could provide the hard/transferable skills. See if there are any gaming conferences etc. in your area. If you're near universities or hightech there are sometimes these things as people are looking into engineering the future of games for educational use. Depending on your child's abilities and interests - describe the potential for a future in creation over consumption. This appeals to Aspies that love innovation, analysis, and/or drawing and character creation.

Shannon Moore said...

I agree with all these comments - Game stores, and for other Aspies: pet stores, book stores, whatever their interest is. They will get to be an expert and they will be taught retail/social scripts that will be invaluable to them to fall back on in life when they need to call banks/doctors/utilities. Tech support is also a great job idea. Ultimately, for someone like this - Video game testing and design could be a lucrative field. Look into classes at the community college (programming, art/design) that could provide the hard/transferable skills. See if there are any gaming conferences etc. in your area. If you're near universities or hightech there are sometimes these things as people are looking into engineering the future of games for educational use. Depending on your child's abilities and interests - describe the potential for a future in creation over consumption. This appeals to Aspies that love innovation, analysis, and/or drawing and character creation.

Exhausted said...

I told my son not to put he had a disability for M&S as I thought he may not get asked to interview. He got through to an interview after spending 3 hours inputting all the info onto laptop inbetween going for a shave and checking his phone. He wore a suit One hour of Roleplay first but after having a real mean customer who wasn't happy with anything(roleplay) he just laughed as he said there was nothing left on the list to offer. He did say that if he worked in the store he would have remembered where every item was in the store. He didn't even get to the interview stage. M&S said if they had know he has ASD then they would of made things clearer. With Aldi he forgot to check emails even though I told him a thousand times to check daily. He was offered to come in for an hour IN JUNE! He cannot apply now for 12 months. He back at college Monday but wants £50 a week to go out with friends. I now work full time as bus/train fair is £40 a week.I know once he gets a job I will not see him but for now xbox and parties with his 100 best friends

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the Aspergers child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

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How to Prevent Meltdowns in Aspergers Children

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and the Asperger’s child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

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Parenting Defiant Aspergers Teens

Although Aspergers is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager with Aspergers are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the Aspergers teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children With Aspergers Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with Aspergers face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

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Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

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to read the full article...

Highly Effective Research-Based Parenting Strategies for Children with Asperger's and HFA

Become an expert in helping your child cope with his or her “out-of-control” emotions, inability to make and keep friends, stress, anger, thinking errors, and resistance to change.

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My Aspergers Child - Syndicated Content