Aspergers Teens and Driving a Car

"My daughter is 18 and has Aspergers. Hers is particularly with anti-social behavior and thoughts. My entire family is ridiculing me for not forcing her to get her drivers license, but she is scared and doesn't want to. Should I force her to? Am I wrong?" 

Click here for my response...

7 comments:

  1. My son has mild Aspergers but like the original post, is just to afraid to drive. I ended up moving with him to another state and made sure he got all his college studies finished. He has a brilliant mind for animals and I found Pikes Peak Community College in Colorado Springs has a great 2 year Zoo Keeper program. He has finished the coursework and still has 3 internships to earn his degree. He tried one internship but didn't feel he fit in and had some pretty bad supervisors. He has since worked a few months at Target and has a stronger work ethic so I think he will be more successful in his next internships. Unfortunatly since we live in Wyoming and it has no Zoo's, we will probabloy have to move again to complete the degree and find him perminate work.

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  2. Yeah, this would be useful if my instructor knew I was an aspie...

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  3. I am a person with autism who has been driving for 15 years. In fact, I drive a car with a manual transmission. Driving was not difficult for me. I have not had a speeding ticket. What helped me was two things:

    1) Previous Knowledge of Physics (yes many of the drivers book rules are based on Physics)

    2) Learning the rules of the road

    3) Knowing the area at first. This was helpful. Although now I have enough experience to drive almost anywhere (About 4 months ago I did a 11 state road trip, driving from California to Illinois and back!).

    4) Getting a good instructor. Unfortunately the person the disability system sent was not the right match for me, so I used someone else I found.

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  4. Driving is not anctiviy everyone must do. In my opinion, you should not force her but explain to her the benefits of driving. They all mature at a different pace and maybe she will be more prepared later. Forcing her would only create more stress on her . Maybe she is not ready, at this time. Let her relax and allow her to want to do it as another accomplishment rather than an obligation.

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  5. My 20 year old aspie son just failed his driving test yesterday. What a rocky 18 hours it's been! He blames the instructor, and feels violent toward him. He said he stands by the judgment call that caused him to fail (not making sure the way was clear before turning right at a stoplight), and that his life is completely off track now. Our DMV has a serious backlog and it will be a month or more until he can get on the schedule to try again. He doesn't see the point in trying again, and seems to have a personal vendetta out on the test-giver. :-( I know this will pass, but I'm thinking maybe he shouldn't try again, at least for a while. He's fine with the bus system, and is about to take a full term of college classes - stressful enough for now!

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  6. Just wondering if anyone has been in this situation my 17 yo aspie was driving to school and was in a head on collision with another teenage driver my son was not at fault and thankfully no one was seriously injured besides some minor cuts and burns from the airbag and glass the insurance company has offered 400 dollars for pain and suffering my husband and I both have medical backgrounds and after his initial er visit we watched him closely and did the follow up appointments I'm not happy with the 400 dollar offer it doesn't even pay for his smashed computer or him being a nervous wreck to drive but I'm scared if I push about it and they ll try to use his aspergers against him we didn't hire a lawyer because we just wanted things to go back to normal and we not trying to get something that's not owed I'm glad he didn't loose his legs I'm just don't want him being screwed because I didn't stick up for him

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  7. Insurance companies routinely offer a token amount. Nobody expects you to accept that amount. Has the insurance co. already assigned a compensation amount for the ER visit, computer replacement, & car replacement? If not, tally all that. If so, figure a dollar amount for your son's lost computer data, any PTSD/therapy, and lost time at school. Has he had a full physical, including tests for concussion? Do not settle right away. There could be delayed back or neck issues. You are not obligated to sign anything until you know what the true "pain and suffering" damage is. I'm answering because I was involved in a similar accident in high school, and they paid us $2,000 right away, but I suffered for years afterwards from migraines and lower back pain. My mom was warned not to settle, but she did anyway, without even countering their initial offer. Their client was at fault. They owe you reasonable compensation, regardless of your son's diagnosis. He has a licence to drive, and that's all they need to know. Best of luck to you, and do not let them belittle you.

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