HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

Education and Counseling for Individuals Affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders

Search MyAspergersChild.com

Autism Spectrum Disorders: Online Resources for Parents

Autism Spectrum Disorder/Asperger Syndrome Information—

1.      Articles on Asperger Syndrome
http://www.specialed.us/autism/asper/asper11.html
2.      Asperger Syndrome Information for Teens
http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetails.aspx?p=243&np=293&id=2320
3.      Australian Autism Education & Training Consortium-Provides details about workshops and information sessions for parents/caregivers of school-aged children who have autism). www.autismtraining.com.au
4.      Autism Advisory and Support Service
http://www.aass.org.au/
5.      Autism Awareness
http://www.autismawareness.com.au
6.      Autism Help Info-Webpage to help professionals, teachers, to understand and support the inclusion of people with ASD. Website funded by The Department of Human Services in Geelong, Victoria, Australia (Barwon South Western region).
http://www.autismhelp.info/main.htm
7.      Autism Help-A wealth of information and on a range of topics relating to  autism and Asperger syndrome)
http://www.autism-help.org/
8.      Autism SA-Information sheets on topics such as challenging behaviors, communication skills, coping with change, strategies for supporting students with autism in the classroom) http://www.autismsa.org.au/html/strategies/infosheets.html
9.      Autism Speaks
http://www.autismspeaks.org/
11.  Carol Gray’s website-Founder of Social Stories and educator in ASD
http://www.thegraycenter.org/
12.  Children, Youth and Women’s Health Service, Parenting and Health, Child and Youth Health
http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetails.aspx?p=114&np=306&id=1944
13.  Information on Asperger Syndrome that is easier for kids to understand
http://www.cyh.com/HealthTopics/HealthTopicDetailsKids.aspx?p=335&np=287&id=2339
14.  Mark LeMessurier
http://www.marklemessurier.com.au/
15.  Monash University -Evidence-based research, as well as information sheets that provide strategies relating to various developmental areas, including communication, social skills and motor skills. http://www.med.monash.edu.au/spppm/research/devpsych/actnow/factsheet.html
16.  OASIS: Online Asperger Syndrome Information and Support
http://www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/
17.  Positive Partnerships: online education about ASD for parents
http://www.autismtraining.com.au/public/index.cfm?returnTo=%2Findex.cfm
18.  Printable handouts
http://www.superduperinc.com/Handouts/Handout.aspx?src=H# (great handouts that are easy for parents to read)
19.  Rainbowland Autism Services
http://www.rainbowlandautismservices.com/
20.  Raising Children Network-Specific support for parents raising a child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder
http://raisingchildren.net.au/children_with_autism/children_with_autism_landing.html
21.  Simon Baron-Cohen-Leading UK expert on Autism Spectrum Disorder
http://www.autismresearchcentre.com/arc/staff_member.asp?id=33
22.  Sue Larkey
http://www.suelarkey.com/
23.  The Disability Information Resource Centre
http://www.dircsa.org.au/
24.  Tony Attwood-Leading Australian expert in Asperger Syndrome
http://www.tonyattwood.com.au/

Counseling Services—

1.      Department of Education and Children’s Services Helpline
Ph:  1800 222 696 or Disability Services Level 6 Education Centre 31 Flinders Street, Adelaide SA 5000 Email: candice.hargrave@sa.gov.au Ph: (08) 8226 0546
2.      Kids Helpline
http://www.kidshelp.com.au/index.php
Ph: 1800 55 1800
3.      Lifeline
http://www.lifeline.org.au/
Ph: 131114
4.      Parent Helpline-A service of Children, Youth and Women’s Health Service, 24 hours a day, seven days a week providing telephone information, counselling and support. Available for parents of children and young people from birth to 25 years, also to those people working with children and young people.
http://www.parenting.sa.gov.au/helpline/
Ph: 1300 364 100
5.      The Second Story Youth Health Centers-Counseling and support available for Youth
http://www.cyh.com/SubContent.aspx?p=190
6.      Youth Healthline-The Youth Healthline is a 24-hour, 7-day telephone service for young people aged 12 to 25 years in South Australia
Ph: 1300 13 17 19
http://www.cyh.com/SubContent.aspx?p=187

Diagnosis and other Support Services—

1.      Autism SA
http://www.autismsa.org.au/html/about/services.html#diagnostic
Autism SA Info Line on 1300 288 476
Autism SA Info Line can also provide you a list of Private Practitioners.
Medicare rebates are available for diagnostic assessments of children under 13 years.  For more information contact the Autism SA Info Line on 1300 288 476 or Medicare 132 011.
2.      Flinders Medical Centre
Ph: 8204 4433
http://www.flinders.sa.gov.au/womenandchildren/pages/paeds/AAL_PDAz_A
3.      Inclusive Directions
http://www.directions.org.au/
4.      Lyell McEwin Health Service
Ph: 8182 9379
http://www.lmh.sa.gov.au/public/content/home.asp?xcid=1
5.      Women’s and Children’s Hospital
Ph: 8161 7287
http://www.wch.sa.gov.au/services/az/divisions/paedm/childdev/index.html
6.      Commonwealth Carelink Centers-Established to assist people with disabilities to navigate through the services that are out there, acting as a single point to obtain current information. Free of charge and confidential:

* North & West Country SA Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre
33 McKay Street
PORT AUGUSTA 5700

* South & East Metropolitan SA Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre
290 Glen Osmond Road
FULLARTON 5063

* North & West Metropolitan SA Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre
77 Gibson Street
BOWDEN 5007

* South East Country SA Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre
4 Third Street
MURRAY BRIDGE 5253

Education—


Educational Websites—

2.      http://do2learn.com/games/learningames.htm (for interactive games, including feelings game, sequencing activity, activity teaching parts of the body, road safety song, matching game, picking the odd one out)

Education/Classroom Strategies and Protocols—


General Disability Information and Education—

2.      Australian Association for Families
http://www.aafcd.org.au/

Government—

1.      A-Z of Disability SA Fact Sheets
http://www.sa.gov.au
2.      Helping Children with Autism Package-Federal funding and support packages available to children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
http://www.fahcsia.gov.au/sa/disability/progserv/people/HelpingChildrenWithAutism/Pages/default.aspx

Online Forums/Groups—


Parent Support Groups—

1.      The Flinders University Early Intervention Research Program
https://socsci.flinders.edu.au/psyc/research/autism/eirp.php
2.      Playgroups and services for younger  children and families with ASD http://www.playgroupaustralia.com.au/sa/go/playconnect-program
3.      My Time groups-A chance to meet and talk with other families of children with a disability and find support and understanding. My Time groups in SA-
http://www.mytime.net.au/index.php/groups/south-australia My Time information-
http://www.mytime.net.au/~mytime/images/stories/PublicDocuments/the%20right%20time.pdf
4.      List of Parent Groups from Parenting SA
http://www.parenting.sa.gov.au/parentgroups/search.asp
5.      Early Development Program at Autism SA-Provides support for young children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder up until the child commences school or 6 years of age and are registered for services with Autism SA.
For further information, contact the Coordinator Early Development Program at Autism SA.
Ph: 8379 6976
6.      A list of parent support groups can be located on the Austism SA Website
http://www.autismsa.org.au/

Recreation—

1.      YMCA of SA: Sharing the Fun-'Sharing the Fun' provides a non-threatening and welcoming environment for children with a disability, in which they can have fun and enjoyment. However, it is not only enjoyable but also beneficial for the children. Whilst having fun, they are also developing the necessary movement skills for successful involvement in integrated physical activities, sports or recreational opportunities. Children who have a disability and are aged between 5 and 13 years can have fun and build on existing skills in Sharing the Fun, which is a non-competitive, recreational after school program which provides a comfortable environment where participants may improve their social and physical skills. http://sa.ymca.org.au/index3.php?O=directory&SID=298&action=View
2.      SASRAPID-The South Australian Sport and Recreation Association for People with Integration Difficulties Incorporated (SASRAPID) is an organisation which assists people with integration difficulties to become involved in community activities. SASRAPID provides assistance and enables participation into valued community sport, recreation and leisure activities. All inclusion is based on the ability and individual choice of the person. http://www.sasrapid.com.au/
3.      Recreation Link-Up-Recreation Link-up is a free service that provides recreation planning, information, education and introductory assistance for people with a disability. Recreation link-up can make it easier for people to become involved in recreation and leisure activities in their local community. Help people to become involved in an activity of their own choice, by developing a plan of action and identifying what needs to be put into place to achieve ongoing involvement. http://reclinkup.ymca.org.au/
4.      Government of South Australia: Office for Recreation and Sport-Specific programs and support for people with disabilities
http://www.recsport.sa.gov.au/programs-services/people-with-disability.html

Respite—

3.      Careers SA
http://www.carersaustralia.com.au/
4.      Centacare
http://www.centacare.org.au/
5.      Commonwealth Respite and Carelink Centre
http://www9.health.gov.au/ccsd/
7.      Disability SA
http://www.sa.gov.au/subject/Community+Support/Disability/Corporate+and+business+information/
Disability+SA/Disability+SA+offices

For more information about who is eligible for respite through Disability SA, telephone 1300 786 117 (cost of a local call) or email disabilitysaintake@dfc.gov.sa.au
8.      Southern Country Commonwealth Career Respite Centre (SCCCRC)-Carers SA manages trhe Southern Country Commonwealth Carer Respite Centre; providing services to caregivers living in the Adelaide Hills, south and east of and including Mt Barker, Southern Fleurieu, Kangaroo Island, Riverland, Murray Mallee and the South East areas. Working in partnership with other services to provide carers with access to respite.
http://www.carers-sa.asn.au/respite.htm

Sex Education—


Siblings—

2.      Siblings Australia
http://www.siblingsaustralia.org.au/

Social Skills—

Triple A Social Development Group-Social development group focused on expressive arts and exploring social issues through theatre, music, writing, and other art forms. There will also be a social element to the sessions for those who wish to meet others and form friendships.
http://www.autismsa.org.au/pdf/TripleA/Expressions_of_interest_info_mail.pdf

Online Resources—

1.      http://www.region2library.org/SocialStories.htm (social story templates - check them out and see if you can modify some of the many social story templates for your own child. There are some that are PowerPoint files, which is a great idea, especially for children who are more motivated by activities and programs that are computer-based)http://pbskids.org/itsmylife/games/story_strips_flash.html
2.      http://www.polyxo.com/socialstories/ (sample social stories and general information about why and how to use social stories to teach specific social skills)

Strategies—


Bullying—


Clipart—

4.      www.dkimages.com 

Communication/language and play—


Feelings and emotions—

1.      http://www.do2learn.com/games/facialexpressions/face.htm  (This website is an interactive one, where the user can create and manipulate a vast range of potential expressions. Specific expressions of being afraid, interested, sad, ashamed, disgusted, surprised, happy and angry are preset on clicking buttons at the top of screen)

Friendship—


Mental Health/Social Anxiety/stress/depression—

1.      http://kidshealth.org/ (a great website, has sections for parents, children and adolescents)

Support Services—

2.      Community Support  Inc-In-home and Community Support
http://www.csisa.org.au/

Visuals—



3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi All:

Wondering if any Floridians with ASD kids on Medicare could chime in, especially those in Palm Beach County (where we now live), or those in Saint Lucie or Indian River Counties (where we're likely moving soon)...

Because of our financial situation (husband's business going under, foreclosure with our house), we had to let go of our (truly super lousy) health insurance coverage (that really was just major medical anyway and ridiculously expensive) for my husband and son this last year, so our son has had no therapy at all since Dx in May (which we had to pay for out of pocket). We finally found out we could apply for KidCare in Florida, so we did. We didn't know we were so poor (LOL) until we got a notice yesterday saying we qualified for Medicare (we were shocked! - wow! we really are broke! LOL), so we won't even have to pay a premium, which is great. My questions for anyone who cares to chime in:

1. Is there a better plan amongst the choices? I can't find anything that does a side-by-side comparison of any of these plans. (I used to get coverage for health insurance through an employer in the "good old days" before I got married, and I always did a plan comparison before I made a choice.) In fact, I can't find anything that lists benefits for any of the plans at all, even generalizations. I have never been on any type of governemental "help" so I don't know how this all works as far as making a smart choice and not getting tied up in the bureaucracy of the system.

2. Do we need to get CMS coverage to get ASD services covered, or is that part of the primary healthcare?

3. Have you had a good experience getting (specifically) ASD help/services? If so, how did you even get going to get your kids help when you were first starting out?

I appreciate any advice or info anyone has because we are just living with a giant question mark over our heads. I'm also going to talk to our contact at CARD to see what she says, but I know it's best to reach out to those who have had some personal experience with the system, and that's all of you on this list! Thanks in advance and wishing a blessing to all kids in the families on this list,

Carrie L.
South Florida

Anonymous said...

Hi everyone, am from Aurora..
this forum and coomunity looks nice.. i am looking forward to have good time here..

currently i am not active member of any forum, but this community appeals me
looking forward to have some good time

Anonymous said...

i am new here and loved the forum don't know if i am posting in the right place..
just wanted to say hi and i hope that i will have good time here

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the Aspergers child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

Click here to read the full article…

How to Prevent Meltdowns in Aspergers Children

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and the Asperger’s child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

Click here for the full article...

Parenting Defiant Aspergers Teens

Although Aspergers is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager with Aspergers are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the Aspergers teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

Click here to read the full article…

Aspergers Children “Block-Out” Their Emotions

Parenting children with Aspergers and HFA can be a daunting task. In layman’s terms, Aspergers is a developmental disability that affects the way children develop and understand the world around them, and is directly linked to their senses and sensory processing. This means they often use certain behaviors to block out their emotions or response to pain.

Click here to read the full article…

Older Teens and Young Adult Children With Aspergers Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with Aspergers face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

Click here to read the full article…

Living with an Aspergers Spouse/Partner

Research reveals that the divorce rate for people with Aspergers is around 80%. Why so high!? The answer may be found in how the symptoms of Aspergers affect intimate relationships. People with Aspergers often find it difficult to understand others and express themselves. They may seem to lose interest in people over time, appear aloof, and are often mistaken as self-centered, vain individuals.

Click here to read the full article…

Online Parent Coaching for Parents of Asperger's Children

If you’re the parent of a child with Aspergers or High-Functioning Autism, you know it can be a struggle from time to time. Your child may be experiencing: obsessive routines; problems coping in social situations; intense tantrums and meltdowns; over-sensitivity to sounds, tastes, smells and sights; preoccupation with one subject of interest; and being overwhelmed by even the smallest of changes.

Click here to read the full article...

Unraveling The Mystery Behind Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism

Parents, teachers, and the general public have a lot of misconceptions of Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism. Many myths abound, and the lack of knowledge is both disturbing and harmful to kids and teens who struggle with the disorder.

Click here to read the full article...

Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

Click here
to read the full article...

My Aspergers Child - Syndicated Content