The Emotional Aspergers Child

23 comments:

  1. Thank you for this article! It is so helpful to read about the different subtypes of Aspies. Every Aspie I meet seems different so this helps us to understand a little more. As I read down the list I was waiting to see which one my 8 yo son is. It looks like he is a Pessimistic Aspie. His intense negativity and your description that "he only enjoys preferred activities" is right-on. Most of the time our family feels like we are held hostage to what our son wants to do, and it's getting worse as he gets older.

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  2. I could see my son in almost every type. Although mostly "type 1". Does anyone know what types of medication are usually prescribed for these kind of issues?

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    1. Hi how is your son doing? My son is 11 and also a pessimistic Aspie. I'm wondering if you've turned a medication? we have been doing behavioral therapy and also a neurofeedback.

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  3. My daughter is very in the "world is out to get me" way of thinking and I can see her in type 1 but also 2 - 5. She takes Zoloft & Methylphenadate. We've seen a positive difference since being on those two. The Methylphenadate is extended release and that works. Although she still is pretty nervous at times it's more manageable. She's also in counseling. So all that put together has helped a lot.

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  4. I see my son in almost all of these too, but especially in Type 1 and type 3 the OCD Aspie. He has what his psychiatrist calls 'Hyper-Focus'.

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  5. Right now he's "hyper-focused" on Star Wars. Love the kid more than the world, but some days it's hard to take. Wish I could get in his head to see what's going on in there :)

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  6. Thank you SO SO much for this article! !!

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  7. Mother of a Type 6 with a little 2 and 3, right here!

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  8. my son has been taking Strattera for a little over a year now I believe, and it has done wonders. He doesn't get anxious nearly as much, focuses much better in school, and only shows minimal signs of OCD now. I know everyone is different though.

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  9. To the family that feels like they're sometimes held hostage, I can completely relate. It will get worse when they get older, so it is imperative to help them learn to CHOOSE a cooperative viewpoint rather than be allowed the position of controling the whole families activities by their tantrums or pessimistic whining. Those can wear you down. You need to NOT feel guilty while they are learning to deal with consequences of a bad choice. For example, everyone in the family wants to go to the park on a picnic except your Aspie child of 10, who insists on staying home to watch a movie. If he goes with you, you know he'll complain the whole time about how awful it is. What should you do? There's more than one way to deal with every situation, and that's why it's good to learn from each other. One possibility; work out a safe place to leave the child (with a GP,Aunt,Uncle, best friend -- no,Great friend!)while the family enjoys their outing. Take pictures of the fun your are having together to share with the child later. Maybe add in something you know they would have really liked (ice cream, a walk in a tunnle,stopping at book store to look at Star Wars books). Then nonchalantly and happily share what took place with the family, later with pictures. It is important that you are ONLY letting them see what they too could have experienced if they chose to go, NOT using it as an "I told you you should have gone" moment. The goal is to help them WANT to be in relational situations, and to learn they can be enjoyable. As well as learning the value of sacrificing something they think is best for themselves for something that might be best for others.

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  10. This is great and spot-on. I think this will help my husband and the school who are having difficulties understanding my son's tantrums and violent behaviors.

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  11. My son was on Strattera. His doctor took him off and put him on Vyvanse and intuniv. I could see him in almost all of them but he is more ADHD and OCD.

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  12. my son is a #1 at school and #6 everywhere else. His Psychiatrist has him on Zoloft, Tenex anad Metadate. The addition of Zoloft has turned him into a #6 at school also.

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  13. Very grateful for this article! I can see my son in a few of the different types but mostly ADHD and daydreamer.

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  14. Thank you for posting this article! I can see my son in several of the different types but he falls mostly in the ADHD and OCD category.

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  15. I see all of these in my daughter, depending on the day, she is more one than the other.

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  16. My son is the emotional, fearful type. It has been incredibly difficult to help him and this advice is good, but where to turn when there are no family supports and community supports are sooo limited? I have utilized supports in home and the most successful approach for me has been nutritional - removing food sensitivities and using supplements. For more info parents can contact me through my website. Anyone who knows of services in Ontario for adult Aspies please contact me. I am currently seeking. Namaste!

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  17. Thank you, Thank you for this great post!! My 5 year old is a little of type 1, but is also so scared of everything new and has a rule or regulation for everything he does. I have enjoyed looking at your blog a lot.
    http://kadensaspergerworld.blogspot.com/

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  18. Great summary, and I plan to highlight aspects for extended family and teachers to read. My teen had terrible (scary) behaviors in school and at home by age 12, and this gradually improved with 1) a clear diagnosis, resulting in some parenting changes, 2) a good ABA consult to set up a behavior plan, and 3) meds, which have variably included ADHD stimulants, antidepressants, antianxietals, and lately antipsychotics (but I think that's another story as there is Bipolar in our family).

    To the parents held hostage: Hard to know what to force and what to let go; I forced social skills training and am glad I did. I also incorporated chores into daily routines to foster a sense of competence. Baby steps!

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  19. Fearful/ defiant
    Really? I didn't know that was a thing. If I was aspie I would be the daydreaming / preoccupied type. Especially when raising a young child and having no time for artistic expression. My son kept getting violent at school- he often accuses others of being first/ getting more- and has violent outbursts at those times as well. I also notice he sometimes has a breakdown if he hasn't eaten- but he doesn't always ask for food when he is hungry. He also retells fiction, but is more focused on science.. Which he can go on and on about.. Very interesting. I have heard of a depressed person being diagnosed with OD, of course alot of Autistic/ Aspergers would have oppositional behaviors.
    LiviaHeleneL@Gmail.com

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  20. My daughter is OCD, daydreamer and stressed. She has been on a low dose of Prozac for almost a year and it has helped her anxiety so much. This is a new diagnosis and I hope to learn more to be able to help her. Thank you for the informative article!

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  21. Thanks for this article. I see myself in some of these definitions, especially daydreamer and anything that is anti-rules. This is all so scary.

    I'm an adult, almost 30 now, and was diagnosed with ADD (non-hyperactivity) about two years ago. Now, I wonder if I have a form of aspergers, too. These articles help.

    I wish there was a brain scan I could do so I could just "know" for sure what I have.

    Best of luck to all the parents and educators who deal with us, you are great people

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  22. Wow, this has been an eye-opening last couple of days. I have been reading up on these different forms of aspergers and see myself in some of them. Specifically the daydreamer type.

    I am an adult now, almost 30, and was diagnosed with ADD (non-hyperactivity) by a professional about 3 years ago.

    I was defiant growing up, inattentive, and a prolific daydreamer. Yet, since I was so bright and never struggled in class, nor had any "serious" behavior problems, nothing was ever formally diagnosed.

    *sigh* I wish I could scan my brain and just "know" what I have for sure.

    Parents and teachers who work with these kids- keep up the learning and patience, you are amazing people.

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