HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

Education and Counseling for Individuals Affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders

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The Misunderstood Aspergers Child

This video reveals the true reasons behind the behavior that some teachers may view as insubordination. Is your Aspergers student "misbehaving" - or is he simply experiencing some "Aspergers-related" symptoms? Either way - you can help!

Note to parents: Please email your child's teacher(s) and send them the link to the video below. Copy and paste the following URL into your email:  http://www.myaspergerschild.com/2012/04/misunderstood-aspergers-child.html



Teaching Students with Aspergers and High-Functioning Autism

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

This video was so good I will definitely forward this to teachers at my son's school … this will help them to have more understanding as he has been diagnosed as high functioning. He has had 3 expulsions since January this year. I feel this will help them to have more understanding. Thank you.

Anonymous said...

I'd be so lost without the articles u post and everyones experiences as I am trying to understand more and more about this condition thank you! God bless
22 hours ago · Like

Anonymous said...

I really wish the teachers at my sons school would read these links.

Anonymous said...

I wish my sons school would just agree with my sons Dr.'s Aspergers diagnosis. They reevaluated our son we were told they believe him just to "emotionally disturbed" and put him back in regular classroom and have modified his work so much he practically does nothing.

Anonymous said...

Just so sickening and heartbreaking that there are so very many misunderstood children out there. . I'm sure we would all love for our children's teachers to read these articles and watch the videos. Instead its much easier to remain ignorant and exclude 'problem' children.

Anonymous said...

Thankyou only been two days and i felt for the first time like i had a conversation with my son. He was swearing and upset and i did the reframing and it worked. Then he started talking about other things and calmed down which has never happened before. You are a lifesaver hope i can take these tips on board permanently. x

Anonymous said...

I am in the process of taking in a child at the end of the year that has Aspergers. His Dad is military and a friend of mine but he has no one else to take him in that would be able to work with him. I have worked and taught Autisum kiddos but know Aspergers is a bit different. My concerns are as follows: The child plays 3-4 hours a day on his Gameboy and doesn't have very many social skills at all. I have tried to talk with Dad about this but it is like he is using the Gameboy as a babysitter..and the games are violent games. The child is 12 now. Am I wrong in seeing this as a problem? The Dad also still showers the child, doesn't allow the child to dress himself and doesn't seem to be teaching him any life skills Dad just does everything for the kid. I find that horrible and the couple times the kiddo was at my house I have taught him things - he is capable for doing them and I see him as having low selfesteem because he isn't allowe!
d to do these things. Diet is another concern with a lot of sugar and not that good of food to back it up. He is on medication which I do not see as helping him that much and the child doesn't eat much when he is on it. I also noticed there isn't much of a routine for the child which I know is very wrong - or at least I am thinking that is. Dad stated he would be bringing out the child and his sister to my place so he could get use to my house and us before he leaves them with me and hasn't even tried to do so. I did send a list of house rules to Dad to start getting the kiddos ready for my house rules (which included the diet, bed time set, gameboy gone but a few hours a week, and teaching the child to take care of himeself) but I do not know if they are being followed and that is when Dad stopped communicating a lot with me. Finally, this weekend Dad posted photos of this child at Military Day holding all kinds of guns which his Dad is teaching him about and h!
as him holding them and laying on the ground like he is going to shoot them as well as holding all kinds of military weapons! This scared the crap out of me ot say the lease and I am very very very concerned at this point! I am worried this child is going to come here and fail because nothing is being followed through, nothing is being set up to help this child succeed and I am going to be left holding the bag to teach this child what he should already know! Am I over reacting to the Gameboy and guns thing? He has a temper and I do not think this child is at a point where he can understand weapons or what could happen? Any advise on this and if you think I am on the right track would be so accept and appreciated! I am a single parent of an 18 yr old right now and do not want to take on more than I can handle...especially if Dad isn't even trying to help this child prepare for this move and all the changes! HELP

Sande said...

I've felt released after watched your video, thereof I've got confirmation and affirmation, thank you so much. Definitely giving me better understanding toward my 14th years old Asperger's boy, who struggled with his school's life. I'll spread out this invaluable link to his teachers and school's board. God bless!

Anonymous said...

I Just watched this and cried all the way through. It is EXACTLY what we have experienced in kindergarten this year. I sent this to my daughters teacher who has been amazing through the difficulties. I know she will appreciate the information. Thank you

Anonymous said...

Interesting! As a teacher and a mom of a child on the spectrum, I find it interesting that parents teachers do not know this. We have trainings on this at our school and meet with guidance to discuss how to help asberger's children be successful in a regular ed class. What has been my experience is that parents want us to allow their child to disrupt class without consequence and make them feel good about themselves regardless of the misbehavior. I am sure that is what the other 20 or so parents think... It's ok for this one child to disrupt class and not be held accountable, and my child talks out and gets his name on the board and loses priveledges. As a Mom, I always said my sons disability was a reason but not an excuse. It is a long term commitment to have him fit into the world that will one day hire him, fire him, and judge him. But it is my job to make him a successful human being that is productive, not the world's job to change.

Anonymous said...

I am so happy to have someplace to go with my frustrations and concerns. My 15-year-old son was diagnosed with Asperger's, Anxiety Disorder, and Attention Deficit during his sixth grade year. That was a year of transition from elementary to middle school, and he had lots of problems adapting to the new environment. Similarly, this year he's been transitioning to high school and has had a lot of trouble keeping up with school or even staying AT school. His dad and I are experiencing a whole new defiance and anger that's never been there before. Recently my son had a psychotic episode and had to be hospitalized because he told his therapist command voices were telling him to do things, such as take a knife to school and burn down a house that is being built in our neighborhood. The psychiatrist at the hospital took him completely off Dexadrine, which my son had been taking for the attention deficit, and this seems to have resolved the psychotic experiences my son was having. A few days ago the hospital released my son, and now he has a lot of homework to finish before the end of the school year. When his dad and I attempt to motivate him, our son becomes defiant. Obviously he has a lot of stuff going on. His dad and I are beginning to suspect by observing his behavior, that my son might be staging some of the more outlandish behavior as a way to get special treatment from us and his teachers. We love this kid and want to learn the best way of helping him become independent. He's extremely creative and talented, but not very motivated.

Anonymous said...

My 5 yr old was having meltdowns everyday when he had to go to a different class. Luckly for us one of his teachers has a special needs child and she realized that he could not control himself. His meltdowns got worse after he has a sub fo
r the day then the next day he had a change in teachers. We have since found out why he was having so many problems at school. It all makes since now. He was recenly diagnosed with Aspergers, it is noce to have a reason why he is the way he is.

Kim said...

I really appreciate this video...we just had an experience this morning and yes, I do feel like my aspie son was just being arrogant, difficult, defiant, etc. It's so hard. While I appreciate understanding my son better, how do I change the way I communicate with him so we have a better outcome? I'd love some tips to follow up with this video.

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the Aspergers child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually. Thus, the best treatment for Aspergers children and teens is, without a doubt, “social skills training.”

Click here to read the full article…

How to Prevent Meltdowns in Aspergers Children

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and the Asperger’s child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

Click here for the full article...

Parenting Defiant Aspergers Teens

Although Aspergers is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager with Aspergers are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the Aspergers teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

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Aspergers Children “Block-Out” Their Emotions

Parenting children with Aspergers and HFA can be a daunting task. In layman’s terms, Aspergers is a developmental disability that affects the way children develop and understand the world around them, and is directly linked to their senses and sensory processing. This means they often use certain behaviors to block out their emotions or response to pain.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children With Aspergers Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with Aspergers face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

Click here to read the full article…

Living with an Aspergers Spouse/Partner

Research reveals that the divorce rate for people with Aspergers is around 80%. Why so high!? The answer may be found in how the symptoms of Aspergers affect intimate relationships. People with Aspergers often find it difficult to understand others and express themselves. They may seem to lose interest in people over time, appear aloof, and are often mistaken as self-centered, vain individuals.

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Online Parent Coaching for Parents of Asperger's Children

If you’re the parent of a child with Aspergers or High-Functioning Autism, you know it can be a struggle from time to time. Your child may be experiencing: obsessive routines; problems coping in social situations; intense tantrums and meltdowns; over-sensitivity to sounds, tastes, smells and sights; preoccupation with one subject of interest; and being overwhelmed by even the smallest of changes. The hardest part is you feel like you’ll never actually get to know your child and how he/she views the world.

Click here to read the full article...

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