HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

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List of Symptoms for High-Functioning Autism

"Is there a list of symptoms or traits associated with high functioning autism in children?"   

Below is a list of common traits among children and teens with High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's. However, no child will exhibit all of these traits. Also, the degree (i.e., mild to severe) to which any particular trait is experienced will vary from child to child.

Emotions and Sensitivities:   
  1. An emotional incident can determine the mood for the day.
  2. Becomes overwhelmed with too much verbal direction.
  3. Calmed by external stimulation (e.g., soothing sound, brushing, rotating object, constant pressure).
  4. Desires comfort items (e.g., blankets, teddy, rock, string).
  5. Difficulty with loud or sudden sounds.
  6. Emotions can pass very suddenly or are drawn out for a long period of time.
  7. Inappropriate touching of self in public situations.
  8. Intolerance to certain food textures, colors or the way they are presented on the plate (e.g., one food can’t touch another).
  9. Laughs, cries or throws a tantrum for no apparent reason.
  10. May need to be left alone to release tension and frustration.    
  11. Resists change in the environment (e.g., people, places, objects).
  12. Sensitivity or lack of sensitivity to sounds, textures, tastes, smells or light.
  13. Tends to either tune out or break down when being reprimanded.
  14. Unusually high or low pain tolerance.

School-Related Skills:   
  1. Difficulty transitioning from one activity to another in school.   
  2. Difficulty with fine motor activities (e.g., coloring, printing, using scissors, gluing).
  3. Difficulty with reading comprehension (e.g., can quote an answer, but unable to predict, summarize or find symbolism).
  4. Excellent rote memory in some areas.
  5. Exceptionally high skills in some areas and very low in others.
  6. Resistance or inability to follow directions.
  7. Short attention span for most lessons.

Health and Movement:     
  1. Allergies and food sensitivities.
  2. Apparent lack of concern for personal hygiene (e.g., hair, teeth, body odor).
  3. Appearance of hearing problems, but hearing has been checked and is fine.
  4. Constipation.
  5. Difficulty changing from one floor surface to another (e.g., carpet to wood, sidewalk to grass).
  6. Difficulty moving through a space (e.g., bumps into objects or people).
  7. Frequent gas, burping or throwing up.
  8. Incontinence of bowel and/or bladder.
  9. Irregular sleep patterns.
  10. Odd or unnatural posture (e.g., rigid or floppy).
  11. Seizure activity.
  12. Unusual gait.
  13. Walks on toes.
  14. Walks without swinging arms freely.

Social Skills:    
  1. Aversion to answering questions about themselves.
  2. Difficulty maintaining friendships.
  3. Difficulty reading facial expressions and body language.
  4. Difficulty understanding group interactions.
  5. Difficulty understanding jokes, figures of speech or sarcasm.
  6. Difficulty understanding the rules of conversation. 
  7. Does not generally share observations or experiences with others.
  8. Finds it easier to socialize with people that are older or younger, rather than peers of their own age.
  9. Gives spontaneous comments which seem to have no connection to the current conversation.
  10. Makes honest, but inappropriate observations.
  11. Minimal acknowledgement of others.    
  12. Overly trusting or unable to read the motives behinds peoples’ actions.
  13. Prefers to be alone, aloft or overly-friendly.
  14. Resistance to being held or touched.
  15. Responds to social interactions, but does not initiate them.
  16. Seems unable to understand another’s feelings.
  17. Talks excessively about one or two topics (e.g., dinosaurs, movies, etc.).
  18. Tends to get too close when speaking to someone (i.e., lack of personal space).
  19. Unaware of/disinterested in what is going on around them.
  20. Very little or no eye contact.

Behaviors:   
  1. Causes injury to self (e.g., biting, banging head).   
  2. Difficulty attending to some tasks.
  3. Difficulty sensing time (e.g., knowing how long 5 minutes is or 3 days or a month).
  4. Difficulty transferring skills from one area to another.
  5. Difficulty waiting for their turn (e.g., standing in line).
  6. Extreme fear for no apparent reason.
  7. Fascination with rotation. 
  8. Feels the need to fix or rearrange things.
  9. Fine motor skills are developmentally behind peers (e.g., hand writing, tying shoes, using scissors, etc.).
  10. Frustration is expressed in unusual ways.
  11. Gross motor skills are developmentally behind peers (e.g., riding a bike, skating, running).
  12. Inability to perceive potentially dangerous situations.
  13. Many and varied collections.
  14. Obsessions with objects, ideas or desires.
  15. Perfectionism in certain areas.
  16. Play is often repetitive.
  17. Quotes movies or video games.
  18. Ritualistic or compulsive behavior patterns (e.g., sniffing, licking, watching objects fall, flapping arms, spinning, rocking, humming, tapping, sucking, rubbing clothes).
  19. Transitioning from one activity to another is difficult.
  20. Unexpected movements (e.g., running out into the street).
  21. Unusual attachment to objects.
  22. Verbal outbursts.

Linguistic and Language Development:     
  1. Abnormal use of pitch, intonation, rhythm or stress while speaking
  2. Difficulty understanding directional terms (e.g., front, back, before, after).   
  3. Difficulty whispering.
  4. Makes verbal sounds while listening (i.e., echolalia).
  5. May have a very high vocabulary.
  6. Often uses short, incomplete sentences.
  7. Pronouns are often inappropriately used. 
  8. Repeats last words or phrases several times.
  9. Speech is abnormally loud or quiet.
  10. Speech started very early and then stopped for a period of time.
  11. Uses a person’s name excessively when speaking to them.

The Aspergers Comprehensive Handbook: Parenting Children with Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism

39 comments:

Lisa Curtis said...

My son was diagnosed with ADHD, OCD and Anxiety last year however I am convinced he has Aspergers. He shows very few signs of ADHD but almost all the hallmarks of Aspergers. My question is, do I need to have him reevaluated? We have made so many adjustments in routine, school and life. I understand him and we work well together to find things that maximize his strengths and navigate his weaknesses. How important is the dx?

Jessica said...

My daughter was diagnosed with the same as your son when she was 6. I accepted it but soon realized she may have anxiety, but she doesn't have ADHD, she's on the honor roll at school, so she completes her work well. However she is 11 now and things keep getting worse. She has several aspergers symptoms. I've been on a wait list with the only specialist in our area for 6 months. She finally gets to go in a few weeks.

TheJolteonMaster said...

"Quotes movies and/or video games"

... My little brother (who is the one that's autistic) never does that, yet almost all of my not autistic friends do that. :P

So, basically, if you're not boring, you might have a few autism symptoms. Heh. Kay bad joke but still... O_o

@Lisa Curtis, getting him diagnosed is usually only necessary if you need to arrange a specific agreement with his teachers or boss to do something that would not normally be done for his peers. Depending upon what specific arrangements you need, as he finishes school and goes to get a job it get's easier to get the more simple arrangements without a specific diagnosis being necessary. You could get him reevaluated just in case, but it's probably not of dire importance if he already has all of the adjustments and help he needs.

Some of the most important support is not always provided by the psychologists anyways, make sure he knows that there is more than one way to make friends and maintain friendships (and that there is more than one kind of friendship), encourage him to join clubs that match his interests, make sure he has friends/classmates/acquaintances that are not on the autism spectrum, and make sure he meets older (preferably independent) people with Autism as well. My brother says the easiest way to make friends is to do what you do best and people will notice you. He got the class elected award for most talkative at middle school graduation, as well as a scholarly award. :)

Mark White said...

I missed it. My nephew is now 13 and my grandmother who has raised him is in denial. I recall him wanting to go to the football field with me and play "tackle" up until he was about 4 years old. He rocked all the time. He is highly intelligent, but, socially, he has difficulty interacting with others. He was suspended from school twice within 3 weeks and was pulled out of school by my grandmother so that she could home school him. My grandmother is an enabler. I really don't what to do to help my nephew. In 5 years, he will be an adult. I never knew anything about Aspergers or high functioning autism, but I feel guilty for not knowing. It hurts.

Caroline Following said...

You shouldn't feel guilty. Educate yourself about the disability in order to interact better with your nephew. I recommend Tony Attwood's books. It's never too late and there is always hope.

Amy Jane said...

Out of all the symptoms given my son displays maybe 5. He's 16 so it's difficult to determine if he might have a very mild form of autism or if he's just a lazy, self-absorbed teenager. My son is highly intelligent (especially with Maths), battles to interact with people if he doesn't know them, is not interested in having a girlfriend though he finds it easier to be friends with girls than with boys, is either shut up in his room or in his sister's room (just reading a book next to her or playing Xbox) and will get his younger sister to do things he's too intimidated to do (like go ask a stranger - such as a shop manager - for something). On the other hand, he is quite loving and, at one stage, drove me crazy with continually wanting to be hugged. So, I really don't know. All I know is that my son is definitely different.

Jessica Ashby said...

Just read your post and it's relieving to see that other parents are in the same boat as us. My son is 2 and while he is not displaying all of the symptoms you posted, he does display quite a few of them. We have had him in therapy for about 6 months now and his teachers are amazing with him. I know they officially do not diagnose until kids are a bit older, but I'm glad to know that my suspicions weren't me just being paranoid and it was actually something that needed to be addressed.

Joni Graham said...

Jessica , this is my child. I know tha he is a compassionate and loving young man, but oh m word. I have spent 80,000 dollars in educating my self to help my son and I know he is high functioning aspergers. Where can I find help please?

Joni Graham said...

please help me be better with him. I come from a past that makes me nearly intolerable control wise and I need help with my son. I have to step aside from my own psychosis to just please God help me with my son. I try to not yell, it affects him so, but sometimes with his inability with control of himself and his emotions, I just suck. I need help. Please advise.

Charlie P. said...

My sister is 16 years old and and believes show almost all of the signs/symptoms of having Aspergers. I am 14 my sister and I were talking to my mother about it to her and she believes the same thing. I was diagnosed at age 10 with A.D.H.D , O.C.D and Selective Mutism but we can't be completely sure I have Aspergers with out being reevaluated. My mother says it is a very long process but I am not sure what to do.

Aaron p. said...

I have a nephew who has High-function Autusim

I just learned this today, and I can definitely see the difference in knowing and NOT knowing. ill always love him no matter what. But I can definitely see the symptoms now that I'm fully aware.

God bless my nephew, and God bless all those going through something simillar. :)

Geddie family said...

Joni Graham I find that sometimes redirecting my child works much better then yelling. Also is I want to know he understood what I was asking or why I'm upset with his action or what ever it maybe I will say eyes here and I make sure he looks at me and also after I say a short sentence I say now what am I asking of you and he repeats it back to me. It's a learning experience and everyday you will learn a new way or idea to help you. I say if I'm really upset you owe me 5 and that means he needs to go to his room or on my bed for 5 mins and then we talk calmly. One thing I have learned is that sometimes they want to tell you something so bad that the brain is moving faster then the mouth so I say I want to understand you slow down and let's think and then talk and if that don't work I will go as far as to say show me what it is I'm not understanding that has him upset and then once he shows me I say oh so you were having trouble getting this to work or that was making you mad and then I'm able to redirect without yelling. I hope the info has helped a little hang in there

Kate Thibeault said...

this just described my whole life.....or at least the first 10 years lol, in just one webpage!

Ann Q said...

I took my son to get tested after a year of battling with his pediatrician for a referral, and the neurologist said that they dont say aspergers anymore. Either your autistic or not so since my son was verbal and communicates he doesn't have autism. He told me his sensory issues will get better when he starts school and all he needs is speach therapy. Needless to say I left the office discouraged and feeling hopeless.

Casimah Locke said...

I'm 32 and I have HFA the one true thing that helps me is a life coach

james said...

AnnQ: Autism is a spectrum, not a has-it or not-has-it thing. Even if your child doesn't have autism or aspergers, he may have developmental delays that can affect his performance in the school. A few suggestions: Don't give up. If you are in the US, go to your school district office. Looks like your son is a pre-schooler, or younger. The school district should have some office that handles special education for pre-schoolers. Ask them to do an evaluation and write down all your concerns for them. Based on the evaluation results, he may qualify for therapy services. You have to go through the system...its free but takes some time. It worked for my twins. Also, change your son's pediatrician if he's not listening to you. In the end, if indeed it turns out that all he needs is speech therapy, then that's great, treat it as good news. Even if he doesn't qualify for speech through your school district (generally he should be at least 1 year delayed in speech to qualify), you can try getting his private therapy...ask for good therapist names through your school district. Where I live (upstate NY), they cost about $35/half hour, not cheap, but something.

Unknown said...

My son was diagnosed with ADHD and ODD at the age at 5, we were given Vyvanse and moved on, but it became apparent that it easy something more. We had 4 hour fights, he has no friends, he's not sorry for doing something wrong, talks no stop about 1 subject..finally 7 years later, he is diagnosed with Autsim, aspergers.. almost all symptoms fit him.. keep pushing, we had a psychiatrist diagnosed him

Unknown said...

My son was recently diagnosed with ADHD anxiety and OCD and recommended for OT due to sensory issues. So I am worried he was misdiagnosed as he exhibits lots of these behaviors and also those of sensory processing disorder. Who would I see to get a second opinion?

Cherie Tubbs said...

The person most qualified to give a diagnosis is a clinical psychologist. They will do extensive testing and have both you and your child, if able, fill out questionaires. A psychiatrist does not have the same level of training in diagnostics. A medical doctor doesn't normally have enough training to give specialized tests for this. If you can't get cooperation from your insurance to see a clinical psychologist, you may try the school district psychologist or contact a non profit couseling center or mental health organization. Best of luck to you. Don't give up. It's just a matter of knocking on doors til someone will listen to your instincts about your child.

Beverly Davis said...

Omg Ann Q they just told me the same thing today. I have 4yr old twin boys and i took them to a pre evaluation today. The lady told me "oh they speak so they don't have autism because people with autism can't speak." Really??? It sure is mighty funny that i see people with autism that can speak and do many other things but just can't control certain things in life. Its just crazy! What is really bad is they have medicaid and we only have 1 doctor in our whole area (within 5 counties or more) that we can go to. There is about a year wait list. It really sucks and something needs to be done about it. I say we start a campain to get our children the help they need!

Nicole Richardson said...

This article is fascinating. My daughter was diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome about six months ago; and pretty much everything on the list above describes her... With the exception of pretty much everything in the "Health" section. My daughter is very healthy and barring some pretty odd (and demanding) sleep patterns - normally as a result of her wanting to watch something on the TV or read into the wee small hours - she has no issues with her phsyical heatlh whatsoever.

Richard Walker said...

I always say it's OK to say autistics are failed versions of normal as long as you say that neurotypicals are failed versions of autistics. Here's my short list of symptoms of neurotypicals behavior
-Always thinks that if someone behaves inappropriately, they have bad motives.
-Willingness to turn on those they once loved.
-how they feel about someone or something is just how they feel. It doesn't have to be logical.
-core beliefs are just general principles.
- lack confidence to establish a personal one of a kind world view.
-overly trusting of those in their tribe.
- lockstep reasoning. Able to parrot others and still think they are original.
- comes to gists easily. Can become exhausted quickly by abstract reasoning.
-unable to imagine realities not experienced.
I could, of course, go on

Hollee Ramey said...

My son is 10 years old. He has had over 30 referals, and aprox. 5 suspensions for his behavior. He finally has an IEP, but the teacher and principal still treat him like he is just bad behaved. He has been diagnosed with ADD, anxiety, ODD, depression, and interment ant explosive disorder. His couselour says that he is pretty sure it's ASD, but they won't diagnose him yet. He is currently taking risperedone, zoloft, and concerta. The meds seem to be working some what, but he still has his days. When he talks to you he plays with his hair. If his routine isn't the same everyday he is thrown for a loop, if something changes at school he goes crazy. We have told him over and over that if you get upset in the classroom you can't just leave to go to the office, but he does anyway. Trying to get the help for my son that he needs is like pulling teeth. All I can say is if you think your kid has ASD get them checked. A lot of teachers now a days just think kids are disrespectful and rude, and don't really understand. I've fault so hard with the schools about my son. He kept telling me that kids where teasing him, but I didn't believe him. It turns out that it wasn't just the kids, it was the teachers too. It's horrible!!!!. Believe in your kids. If you feel something is wrong there is no harm in getting them checked out.

David Farmer said...

Sooner the better. I say this as a male aged 49 just coming to the conclusion of having this, I don't know if I should say blessing or a curse. I have all the traits of this, even though some are not as dominate as when younger. Not sure if grown out of severity, or just curbing, or use to it. 40 years ago, I hadn't heard about autism, or much of anyone. Life can be a struggle, some days I'm a rock star, other days, not so much. social and jobs, relationship skills seem to suffer the most. Seek all paths for help and understanding soon as deemed

Nayely Onofre said...

I have a concern my son happens to have alot of these signs but is it true that they are not interested in making friends

Richard Walker said...

"They" is a word to be avoided with aspergers. I remember having an obsession with slot car racing as a child and I needed kids to play with. I have memories (and autistics tend to have accurate memories) of lots of playtime with other kids. Even adult neurotypicals tend to play golf and such to make connections. It's important to remember that aspies make fun friends if they have common interests. Again, I'm generalizing like you did. The thing to remember is that we need connections like "normal " people. We just suck at how to do it or even knowing how.

onlinecash7 said...

Hi I read your post and I am experiencing same with my daughter the school is no help and a lot of critism goes on when my daughter is in the school environment she's been diagnosed with seizures anxiety ADHD and autism spectrum symptoms through IEP team but teachers are very non supportive.

laurel said...

Wow. I'm just learning about aspergers. I was diagnosed as an adult with ADHD, anxiety, some ocd, etc. But reading these symptoms makes me think that this is me! I've been worried about my 13yo daughter being on the spectrum. She was diagnosed with inattentive ADHD and I know she suffers extreme anxiety. She is well above average intelligence, very docile and obedient (yet passive aggressive when in disagreement). I don't know if the aspergers fits her as much as she is extremely quiet yet wants friends. She has friends but doesn't seem to really understand social skills and has big problems with empathy. Recently she seems very uncomfortable with her "femaleness". She's been dressing like a boy and wanting to be considered transgender which is a trend that seems to be happening with her friends as well. I believe they are influencing her but I also sympathize with the fact that she's transitioning into a woman and isn't comfortable yet with boys or people seeing her that way. She has never been this way until joining this particular group of friends. Anyway, thank you all for sharing. I'm sorry I have no advice for you at this moment. I'm struggling to save my daughter from suffering permanent damage from the trials of middle school without alienating her. Prayers for all of us.

ASC HealthCare said...

Your child has normal cognitive abilities and has experienced normal language development, but has been diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome or High Functioning Autism, and you have asked for help. This is an important turning point in your journey. For some families, this may be the point when, after a long search for answers, you now have a name for something you didn’t know what to call, but you knew existed. Many families report mixed feelings of sadness and relief when their child is diagnosed.

Richard Walker said...

As anyone with aspergers knows, the advantages and disadvantages of this mindset aren't always clear. Become familiar with these strengths and weaknesses so your child, as an adult, can find where best to highly function and how best to feel about the different parts of his personality and character.

Hey, you said...

My daughter was born in 1987, and no one had ever heard of AS then. I knew from the beginning there was a "problem", a unique inner experience; no therapist could perceive it, and two child psychiatrists told me her IQ was too high to test properly and that she was "normal". Extremely intelligent, began using English and eight months, very high grades until she hit junior year in high school (we moved 150 miles from the home we both loved), the hallmarks of brilliance and creativity: AS people can be, and some are, the most intelligent among us. But....with AS can come severe depression at the onset of puberty; and, with AS the co-morbity of complex psychosis is statistically significant. My daughter developed schizophrenia and succumbed to her horror at age 23. NAMI told me "Twenty three is the 'magic age' for Schizophrenia, you are in the for the ride of your lifetime." The information in list of symptoms in this link is vast and not all children will have all symptoms, and not all symptoms means a child has AS. But I can say this: had any mental health professional been able (at the time, when nothing was known about AS) to properly diagnose her, the underlying psychosis MAY NEVER have destroyed her mind. IF you have ANY suspicions, there are major hospitals across the USA who have AS clinics and can properly evaluate your child. How many AS children are in the foster care system? My guess: thousands. Why? Because they require a special sort of parenting, unconditional love, enormous patience. When my daughter began drawing (her skill as an artist was enormous) at age three, and then continuously until her psychosis made it impossible (if you put a piece of paper in front of her, she drew elaborate things on it), I knew that meant something. No one would listen to me.

Roxanne Mclaughlin said...

I'm no professional but I think it's more important to focus on understanding and belong your child as you see their issues than it is to get a certain evaluation to label them. Labels cause nothing but troubles. If your child has a lot of these symptoms and they have been evaluated and they want to name it a million different complexes it's not going to change who they really are and what you know they really need. They need guidance and help not labels. :)

My Life As I Live It said...

I am a teenager and was just diagnosed with Aspergers yesterday.I am high-functioning, though.It was pretty cool to learn that I was highly intelligent and 1 in 1000, but not so cool to learn that I have sensory issues and have a lot of motor ticks and such (although I already knew I had sensory issues and motor ticks, just did not know it was related to Aspergers).When my parents told me I wanted to jump for joy because this has validated me feeling like I was from another planet or just felt I was too different, but it also made me want to cry because I thought other people might mistake this for straight up autism.I am coping though.I have high verbal, lingustic, arts, buisness and writing skills, but I am terrible at math and other complex things.

It's cool to know I am special...but at the same time am afraid that other people may treat me differently than they used to.I was very anti social as a child and quite lucky to have some friendships today...and I'm a little bit afraid of losing them.That's okay though, because I march to the beat of my own drum and it doesn't bother me if people leave me.So, there is no other reason I am commenting on this page, other than to say, that I have Aspergers, and I am coping.

Will Graham said...

A lot of people say that labels are bad but I was SO relieved to find out I had Asperger's. I think labels can be good because suddenly I wasn't a "bad neurotypical," I was an Aspie. It gave me validation. It gave me a community.
I'm 16 and I've always known I was "different" but I didn't come across ASD until last year. My cousin is very, very severely autistic (completely non-verbal and requires constant care) so that was always how I perceived autism, and I was like, "no, I'm not like that." But then I learned that autism is a spectrum, and no two autistic people are the same.
I think I went undiagnosed because I learned how to mimic behaviors and gave off the appearance of just being "anti-social," but it's more than that. I have trouble connecting with people and understanding people. Sure, I can tell when someone is happy, or when someone is sad, or angry. I've learned, over time, how to read basic body language and tone of voice.
But I still struggle with conversation, and with forming meaningful relationships. I didn't have friends until high school. I'm lucky to have friends who are so understanding and supportive. But I'm different, and I'll always be different.
I asked my mom about it and she said that she always suspected I had Asperger's. My dad refused to believe that I have Asperger's, though. It's funny because he shows a lot of symptoms of Asperger's, and we're really alike, so I think he doesn't want to admit that he could potentially have Asperger's.
I think the best thing for parents of autistic children to do is to listen to autistic people. We've lived through this. We can give you advice that a therapist can't. Be patient with your kids, and be accommodating. A lot of great people were autistic or believed to be autistic, so I think we have a lot to offer. It might be tough, since we do have sensory and behavioral issues, but it pays off. :)

Richard Walker said...

Will Graham: Thanks for sharing. Relationships are actually more fulfilling for many aspergers than for many neurotypicals. We share information with friends that actually reflects our sense of self so when we talk with others, we aren't just being with someone and enjoying their presence emotionally, we are actually becoming each other.

Matt Evans said...

I'm sorry Roxanne but as someone who was diagnosed with ASD later on in life nothing is more important than that label.

Without that label people will not give you that understanding. In fact they will blame you for not fitting in with their social norms you are treated as being the guilty party in any misunderstanding.

That label allows you to seek help catered to your needs. In many countries that label offers you legal protection from discrimination caused by your condition. Most importantly that label forces people to accept that you are an individual with individual needs and that they can't judge you in accordance with their social norms.

Unknown said...

This sounds like me. I don't want the doctors to know. But I have had trouble with language and other things I have a very extensive vocabulary that was far beyond my age. My mom also had it too so yah I am just freak but I am proud.

Pastor John Werth Sermons said...

Neuropsychologist I recently spoke with says Aspbergers isn't an accepted term in the field anymore. He disagrees with that, because he believes in the spectrum idea of autism and not the "you have it or you don't" concept. I am trying to get a therapist to look at the reasons underlying my daughter's social anxiety and depressions. She scores in the autistic range on the CAST and AQ testing instruments. I get that these aren't diagnostic, but I think they are pretty strong indicators that we need to look beyond presenting symptoms to underlying issues.

Unknown said...

As I read this I have tears in my eyes. I live in Toronto Canada and have been dealing with these issues with my 8 year old son since he was 3. He has also been diagnosed with ADHD, General Anxiety Disorder and OCD. It honestly is non stop. I feel for him everyday and only wish I could live in his head for 1 week to experience his perception and interpretations of his environment perhaps I could better help him. I have him in OT which seems to help slightly but the truth is it's a daily struggle and some days are better than others. As a parent I'm going to speak to the other parents or care givers on this board and say we need to be proud of ourselves for all we are doing. We need to never stop trying to understand them and searching for answers to help them. We need to always make sure they feel loved no matter how exhausted or frustrated we are. I have cried many times feeling helpless but it helps me to see this board and know I'm not the only one struggling. I wish you all here the best and hope and pray we find some answers but the fact that we are here shows that we care and are doing all we can for our babies no matter what their age is. good luck all.

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the Aspergers child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

Click here to read the full article…

How to Prevent Meltdowns in Aspergers Children

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and the Asperger’s child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

Click here for the full article...

Parenting Defiant Aspergers Teens

Although Aspergers is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager with Aspergers are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the Aspergers teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

Click here to read the full article…

Aspergers Children “Block-Out” Their Emotions

Parenting children with Aspergers and HFA can be a daunting task. In layman’s terms, Aspergers is a developmental disability that affects the way children develop and understand the world around them, and is directly linked to their senses and sensory processing. This means they often use certain behaviors to block out their emotions or response to pain.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children With Aspergers Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with Aspergers face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

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Living with an Aspergers Spouse/Partner

Research reveals that the divorce rate for people with Aspergers is around 80%. Why so high!? The answer may be found in how the symptoms of Aspergers affect intimate relationships. People with Aspergers often find it difficult to understand others and express themselves. They may seem to lose interest in people over time, appear aloof, and are often mistaken as self-centered, vain individuals.

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Online Parent Coaching for Parents of Asperger's Children

If you’re the parent of a child with Aspergers or High-Functioning Autism, you know it can be a struggle from time to time. Your child may be experiencing: obsessive routines; problems coping in social situations; intense tantrums and meltdowns; over-sensitivity to sounds, tastes, smells and sights; preoccupation with one subject of interest; and being overwhelmed by even the smallest of changes.

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Unraveling The Mystery Behind Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism

Parents, teachers, and the general public have a lot of misconceptions of Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism. Many myths abound, and the lack of knowledge is both disturbing and harmful to kids and teens who struggle with the disorder.

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Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

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My Aspergers Child - Syndicated Content