HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

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Why Females Are Less Likely To Be Diagnosed

The vast majority of referrals for a diagnostic evaluation for High-Functioning Autism  (HFA) are boys. The ratio of males to females is roughly around 10:1; however, the epidemiological research for HFA suggests that the ratio should be 4:1. Why are girls less likely to be identified as having the characteristics indicative of an autism spectrum disorder?


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6 comments:

Anonymous said...

because they don't look for it until it's staring them in the face and they have no other options left. At least, that was my experience. They wanted to label it bad behaviour and bad parenting before they would consider Asperger's. (and it was the third doctor that would finally listen and consider it).

Lisa said...

I've forwarded this article to my daughter's high school counselor... what a difference the last 4 years could have been if they'd really looked at why she seemed unable to ask for help and was disconnected from school instead of labeling her as lazy and unmotivated. Even after finally getting a diagnosis last spring, they essentially blew it off because "she laughed at jokes and participated in the 2 classes they observed"...ceramics (all about effort, not ability), criminal justice (no homework and a teacher who "got her"). She graduates next week and as I've been telling her for years, "the rest of her life begins".

Bulldogma said...

GREAT post! Thank you SO much for broaching this subject. We had to practically pull teeth to get a proper diagnosis for our Aspie.

Nsaneaspiemom said...

Before I even knew what it was I had her diagnosed. her traits were strong! But i did not say a word to the specialist who ran all the tests, but she confirmed it pretty much right away! I noticed things from the time she was only a few months old.

Anonymous said...

I agree Sandra, also girls obsessions tend to be more girl acceptably, for my dd cats, and horses. My dd's dx is NVLD which is very similar to aspergers, but with visual spacial difficulties, and fine and gross motor issues. There is much overlap in the two.

Zoe said...

This is all very interesting I have just started the process to get diagnosed I am 34. My son is an Aspie.
I always found myself with a dominant friend. Someone who could do all the talking for both of us... I could follow..copy or mimic. And definitely stay in the shadows. My main aim at school was not to be noticed...I pretty much succeeded at that.
I also did a lot of dance and drama. Actually trained as a dancer, the only thing I would say is that actually making a career in such a competitive industry was beyond me at the time.
Now I understand - having to talk to prominent people and selling yourself is as important as talent...Something I couldn't do...
I would definitely be interested to be part of any research.. Well done to parents for noticing, I think it is harder to identify girls...

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the Aspergers child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

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How to Prevent Meltdowns in Aspergers Children

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and the Asperger’s child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

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Parenting Defiant Aspergers Teens

Although Aspergers is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager with Aspergers are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the Aspergers teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children With Aspergers Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with Aspergers face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

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Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

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Highly Effective Research-Based Parenting Strategies for Children with Asperger's and HFA

Become an expert in helping your child cope with his or her “out-of-control” emotions, inability to make and keep friends, stress, anger, thinking errors, and resistance to change.

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My Aspergers Child - Syndicated Content