HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

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Aspergers Plus ADHD

Question

My daughter is 9 and has ADHD and Asperger's. She takes Methylphenidate twice a day so that she may focus at school, but when the second dose wears off she becomes uncontrollable. She is loud & completely disobedient. I have a 6 year old son also and am a single mother. I am at my wits end. I feel like I have tried everything and nothing works. She talks back to me always. There is not one time that I ask her to do something that she doesn't argue back. Please help me :o)

Answer

It sounds like she does fine until her meds wear-off. We’ll start there…

Have you tried sustained release forms of ADHD medication, or one of the long acting stimulants?

Sustained release forms of these medications have the benefit that the medication is often still working after school, as your youngster is trying to do his homework. The sustained release pills must be swallowed whole (except for Adderall XR).The long acting stimulants generally have the duration of 8-12 hours and can be used just once a day. They are especially useful for kids who are unable or unwilling to take a dose at school.

At least 80% of kids will respond to one of the ADHD stimulants, so if 1 or 2 medications don't work or have unwanted side effects, then a third might be tried. It can help if you are aware of the different medications that are available. Stimulants are considered to be first line treatments, and antidepressants are second line treatments and might be considered if 2 or 3 stimulant medications don't work for your youngster.

Here is a list of long acting stimulants to explore with your youngster’s doctor:

• Adderall XR— Adderall XR is approved for use in kids over the age of six years, although regular Adderall can be used in younger kids from 3-5 years of age. Adderall XR is a sustained release form of Adderall, a popular stimulant which contains dextroamphetamine and amphetamine. It is available as a 10mg, 15mg, 20mg, 25mg, and 30mg capsule, and unlike many of the other sustained release products, the capsule can be opened and sprinkled onto applesauce if your youngster can't swallow a pill.

• Concerta— Concerta is a sustained release form of methyphenidate (Ritalin). It is available as a 18mg, 36mg and 54mg tablet and is designed to work for 12 hours. Teens can take two 36mg tablets to get to a dose of 72mg. Like Adderall XR, it is only approved for kids over the age of six years.

• Daytrana— Daytrana is a methyphenidate or Ritalin patch. The patch is available in 10mg, 15mg, 20mg, and 30mg dosages, which are worn for about nine hours at a time on a youngster's hip. The medication in your youngster's system then continues to work for a few more hours once you take the patch off, although you may have to figure how the patch works best for your youngster. One benefit of the Ritalin patch, in addition to working well for kids who don't like to take medicine, is that it gives you a lot of flexibility. For example, on some days your youngster could just wear the Daytrana patch for a few hours and on other days he could wear it a little longer if he has extra homework (as long it doesn't interfere with bedtime).

• Focalin XR— An extended release form of Focalin, with the active ingredient dexmethylphenidate hydrocholoride, which is also found in methylphenidate (Ritalin). It is available in an 5mg, 10mg, 15mg, and 20mg capsule.

• Metadate CD— This is also a long acting form of methylphenidate (Ritalin).

• Ritalin LA— This is is a new long acting form of methylphenidate (Ritalin). It is available in 10, 20, 30, and 40mg capsules. Unlike the other long acting forms of methylphenidate, the Ritalin LA capsules can be opened and sprinkled on something if your youngster can't swallow them whole.

• Vyvanse— The latest medication to get approval to treat ADHD is Vyvanse, a long acting stimulant that is similar to Adderall. In fact, its main ingredient is lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, a derivative of one of the ingredients in Adderall. Initially available in 30mg, 50mg, and 70mg capsules, newer 20mg, 40mg, and 60mg capsules should be available soon.

Side effects of stimulants can include a decreased appetite, headaches, stomachaches, trouble getting to sleep, jitteriness, and social withdrawal, and can usually be managed by adjusting the dosage or when the medication is given. Other side effects may occur in kids on too high a dosage or those that are overly sensitive to stimulants and might cause them to be over-focused on the medication or appear dull or overly restricted. Some moms and dads are resistant to using a stimulant because they don't want their youngster to be a 'zombie,' but it is important to remember that these are unwanted side effects and can usually be treated by lowering the dosage of medication or changing to a different medication.

Here are several points to keep in mind with regard to medication for Aspergers and High-Functioning Autism:

• Anti-Depressants May Be Needed— While many kids with Aspergers present with hyperactivity, there is a tendency for teenagers to suffer from depression. There are various reasons why depression may be so common. For example, teens with Aspergers generally want to fit in socially. They can become depressed when they fail to fit into society's molds or norms or can't grasp the importance of its rules. Depression may also hit as they deal with anxiety and obsessive behaviors.

• Consider non-Medical Therapies— There are several therapies that are proven to be effective in treating and improving behaviors in children with Aspergers. Behavioral therapies help the child learn to cope with obsessive tendencies, deal with tantrums, cope with anxiety or control angry outbursts. Social skills classes help them to understand more of the back-and-forth nature of communication. Speech therapy can help them understand different uses of language. Occupational therapy improves the clumsiness or lack of co-ordination problems.

• Diet and Vitamin Treatments Improve Symptoms— Nutritional deficiencies and mal-absorption problems are common in Aspergers children. Many parents report success with a restricted diet or adding vitamin supplements. Other parents report success with the gluten and casein-free diet or a low-sugar, low-yeast diet. It is best to get a blood or stool test to check for any food intolerances or vitamin deficiencies. Consult a nutritional therapist if you want to go this route. After testing, some common vitamins that Aspergers children often use include: B vitamins, zinc, magnesium, Vitamin C and cod liver oil supplements.

• Medications for Anti-Anxiety or ADD/ADHD are Useful— Anxiety and stress are usually elevated in Aspergers children and teens. They often require medications to cope with the anxiety. Children with Aspergers also struggle with concentration, hyperactivity, focus and attention. Medicines to target ADD or ADHD have proven useful for Aspergers. There can be side effects with new behaviors showing up, however, so any medication use needs to be closely monitored.

• There Is Not Just One Medication— While many of the symptoms of Aspergers can be treated with a variety of medications, there is not one magic pill for the syndrome. Aspergers children and teens often lack proper social skills, have obsessive tendencies and can be clumsy or awkward. Some medications can be used to improve specific behaviors associated with Aspergers, such as anxiety, hyperactivity or attention deficit.

My Aspergers Child: Preventing Meltdowns and Tantrums in Aspergers Children


COMMENTS:

•    Anonymous said... I feel your pain.... I have 3 with ASD and complex behavior challenges including ADHD. Maybe there is a different dose that is more time released ? I am about to go the med route for my daughter. She is so difficult and has been since she was 1.5... She is six now. Ugh it's so draining!!!
•    Anonymous said... I'm familiar w this. Repeat every request and or argue for every little thing.
•    Anonymous said... We have three rules for our family. Each one has a clear consequence. By making these clear then following through discipline is simplified enough that we can spend most our energy on positive interactions with our son. Two years on this approach and he's got himself so much under control that he and his therapist weaned him off all meds. In his case he would take all the emotional power we would give him, so we just had to take the emotions out of correction and give him very clear expectations and hold him calmly to them. Then, we did all we could to let him know we adore and enjoy him just the way he is. In the end my belief is that the work is Gods inside our kids hearts, so prayer is the best thing you can do for your kids, but schedule, routine, clear expectations, calm correction, and happy parents are things that can benefit every family.
 
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34 comments:

Anonymous said...

My son is 10 and has be dx with aspergers and add but isnt on meds now....he had a trial of adderall when he was 5 and it just made it worst and then at the age of 9 they tried concerta all of which did not help but made his behavior even worst....Do they have other meds that can help other than stimulants....I am at a lost here...

Anonymous said...

Strattera is a non-stimulant. If your child has anxiety, stimulants can make that worse, and as we all have learned, when their anxiety levels are hightened, so are all of their Asperger's and ADHD sympotms. Straterra did not work for my son though -- it gave him headaches, nausea, dizziness and even halucinations. His pediatrician switched him to Adderall XR and then to Vyvanse, neither of which worked bc they increased his anxiety so much. Then we went to a specialist who explained that of all the ADHD meds, those two have the highest report of increased anxiety symptoms. He prescribed Folcalin(which has the least reported anxiety side effect) and it has worked wonderfully.
Let me also say that the extended release doesn't always work for everyone. We saw NO DIFFERENCE whatsoever between the XR and non XR forms. So, he takes 10mg 3x per day (7am, 11am and 3pm) and that is what works best for us. it's all trial and error, which sucks when it comes to our kids, but it is what it is.

Sandra said...

My 8 year old has the same problem. He has been switched from methylphenidate to biphentin, which is a long acting form of the same med. He went from 3 doses a day of 4 hours duration, to 1 dose that is supposed to last from 8-10 hours. The problem is, you know when it wears off because he gets really hyper and can't focus or settle at all, even with help. It carries him right past bedtime, so he doesn't go to bed on time and has trouble falling asleep, then he can't wake up on time and complains of feeling ill in the morning. Once back on his next dose, he is generally fine, until it wears off again. It is hard! He hasn't been diagnosed with Asperger's, but his sister has. He still has multiple issues that are similar to hers, but not identical, so I have been using some of the Asperger's tips and finding that they often work better for him than they do for his sister (shortly to be 13 and the hormones are making her unbelievable!)

Genevieve said...

my son is ADHD, he had many similar symptoms. We tried focalin for a year or so. It was a help, but then we saw him get better at controlling himself more. I had alittle trouble with the side effects, he wasn't eating very well. So, I gave him a break from the medicine. He did so well, that I don't think he will ever need it again. But i must say that it helped him quite alot. Now he is almost 11, and he is doing so well. We tried Strattera for a short time, and that did not work well. It will depend on your child, but going to the doctor did help us some. Now, I think that all along he may be on the ausperger spectrum. So, I will be finding out more information. Just thought this might help you. Be patient, with your child and yourself. I was very surprised this year, and now people have really noticed the changes. I think it's also a maturity change due to age.

Anonymous said...

I would not discount ADHD meds at all. My ds has HFA and takes meds for ADHD and they really help a lot. No, they don't change the fact that the kid has autism or AS and they are not designed to remediate those problems. They are designed to deal with hyperactivity and attention. They will not work for everyone but when they do work, it is well worth the effort to find what works. We have tried several over the years with varying degrees of success. Now we are using "focalin" which is working great. No, they don't fix his problems with communication but it does allow him to focus and sit still - both things that help him understand his school work and learn. He can learn to communicate if he can pay attention long enough. if you have a kid who literally cannot sit still or pay attention, you will understand how this helps. Sometimes I have lulled myself into believing it was not that important. Like this last time - we decided we had to try something because he literally cannot sit still through a class or assignment. I have to sit here and keep redirecting him constantly. So I was so amazed at how much this has helped him (how well I had deluded myself really, lol). He's still got issues, still got autism, still needs help staying on task. But it is like "night and afternoon" difference. He can stick with it much longer and think things through much more efficiently and make sense! So often, he loses his train of thought. He can at least keep it together now. So it does definitely help. I guess it will depend on how big the attention issues are really and how much time/effort a person can invest in keeping the child on task.

Anonymous said...

For those who don't have any luck with stimulants like us, Intuniv works wonders!! My 9 year old son who has Asperger's had no luck with focalin. He would have severe mood swings, tiredness, cried constantly, etc. Then we tried Intuniv which is a newer drug recently approved by the FDA. It hws been wonderful with very little side effects. :0)

Anonymous said...

I feel so helpless at times......my 8 year old son has Aspergers. After his awesome swimming lesson yesterday we ventured over to the spray pad where he proceeds to shove a girl down....and states she was hogging the water....omg. I try so hard to work with on his "stop and think" but he continues to act out impulsively.

Anonymous said...

Kristie Carr Nelson
Unfortunety, it going to take lots and lots of repetition and experience for him. We're still working on impulse control with our 11 year old. He and I came devised a plan to help him to manage his stress. When he feels the need to act out, he's worked at telling himself to follow his plan (at home that's to go to his room until he's calmed down). Does it work all the time. No! But, it is working and he's slowly replacing the impulse to act out with the control to remove himself before hurting someone or something. 7 and 8 were hard years for him. We've seen the most growth and maturity and 10 and now 11. We attribute this success to professional, medicinal, and educational help. He's learning the skills to self-manage and we're so much more hopeful!!
Saturday at 1:56pm · Like
Amanda Rose Daily-Daub My little guy is the same - impulsive, but also very logical about why he has to act impulsively. LOL
Saturday at 3:06pm · Like
Keturah Broadwood
We have had the same issues. We now use some sign language and we find that helps. At 4 he was completly uncontrollable and massively impulsive. He is now 7 and we have been using a few sign language signals for over a year and it seems to be helping. We mainly use stop, think, gentle, space (as in personal space) etc. It doesn't alaways work but it helps being able to tell him things in public without belittling him or having to explain to everyone that he has ASD. he has even started useing the signs to himself as a physical reminder to a mental trigger. It does help that he is borderline gifted though.
Saturday at 6:09pm · Like

Anonymous said...

Extremely helpful comments. I can relate. At age 12 his biggest problem relates to his apparent misperception of others actions. Since we are not at school/camp with him it is hard to assess the triggers. He is so competitive and is a stickler for game rules which can ruin the fun for others. He is persistent in his beliefs. He is bright and can argue the logic of his point which gets really annoying. He says his peers "annoy" him to the point were he feels victimized. We continue to work on social skills. Antidepressant only at this time since ADHD meds didn't work. Guanfacine helped with impulsivity somewhat but made him sleep too much.
Every year is better as executive function improves. We have hope of continued improvement through his upper 20's.

Anonymous said...

Hi all, we are currently waiting on a diagnosis for my 5 year old. In the meantime we continue to work on his ADHD and Sensory Processing Disorder. Just wondering if anyone has used Catapres for ADHD? If so, was it successful and were there any side effects?

Anonymous said...

Michelle Cagle
We use adderal for my eight year old son. I've noticed a big improvement in his hyperactivity. It's not a cure by any means. It's just one of those helping powers. I hesitated for years to put him on any medications. I know its not the most acceptable alternative. You should always remember you are his mom and you know what's best for him. It was our experience that Quinlan was very tired and had no appetite(I know aspie child not eating, not unusual) it took about two weeks for him to level into the medication.
37 minutes ago · Like

Anonymous said...

Kay Munro
Thanks Michelle, we were very reluctant to start him on meds but, he started school this year and was not coping well at all. We trialled him on Ritalin initially which worked for approx 3 weeks then seemed to have the opposite effect. The hyperactivity actually increased, the meltdowns became more frequent and he wasn't sleeping. We've taken him off the Ritalin and are about to trial the Catapres in the hope that it will be more calming for him and increase his concentration at school.
Thursday at 6:36am · Like
Richelle Lewis I used catapres for my son and it just made him tired. Usually when an adhd stimulate med has the opposite effect on a child that mean they aren't adhd.

Anonymous said...

My 14-year-old son was diagnosed with Aspergers, ODD, and ADHD. He was in therapies until the age of 7 - occupational, physical, speech, and psychiatric. I got married last year and moved to Israel. Since being in Israel, my son is even harder to control. He actively defies me and will not do anything that is asked of him unless he is threatened with something being taken away. He says no a lot, but only does this at home with me (mother). He makes excuses or sidetracks discussions with nonsense answers. He is exceptionally smart, but also manipulative. He has never had any real friends in his life and no one has ever been able to be around him and enjoy it. He doesn't understand why no one likes him. I don't know what to do. My husband doesn't want him on Ritalin. My son has been off of it since he was 11. I don't especially want him on it either. He did really well in school, but still wouldn't do anything I asked him to !
do while he was on it. What therapy, treatment, or behavioral modification is right for him? I fear he will never be able to live on his own because of his behavior and disregard.

Anonymous said...

My daughter is 14 has the same as your son aspie,ocd ,adhd what I would do is block the phone number of the girl and make sure he dosnt know it , I monitor my daughters text messages and she is obsessing about guys who are older . She has gotten in trouble 3 times with the 18 years and older guys who smoke pot but she dosnt do pot . She holds onto the new guy the best she can but I would try to block the number and find as many activities as possible other hobbies to try to get his mind off of her . I would change math classes its all you can really do the less he sees her maybe he wont think about her as much . I hate to say it but monitor his computer time , put a timer on the computer and it will shut off he wont be sitting there waiting for a reply . I would just try to take him to do fun things as much as possible the obsessing is hell , I have been through this so many times I had to put my daughter on birth control because her new thing is sexting and I blocked all internet access on her phone and told her , that her dad dosnt pay the phone bill for her to do pornographic talking to strangers and that was it . She does have meltdowns 2 times a week and what is weird it happens at night , I have also discovered she is sugar sensitive , and the caffeine does make the anxiety worse she will pick at her skin. I hope some of what I said will give you some new ideas , the internet has destroyed my daughters life she is now emo because she is copying the identity of people online because she has low self esteem and feels worthless all the time. The technology is all kids have now but with the ways our kids minds work they need strict limits . As far as not eating its the depression , I have to switch medications constantly , I know its horrible cant find the right combination my daughter is on 10 1/2 mg Lexapro and 450 mg triliptal 2 x a day . Depression is the worst with all the disorders its a monster of its own it took over my daughters brain she lost interest in everything and the meds are helping a little.

Anonymous said...

Hi everyone I am new here looking for answers as I am sure most of you are. I am mom to my 7yr old daughter with Aspergers, ADHD and reactive attachment disorder. My daughter has a number of quirks that drive my husband and I up the wall from one day to the next but my biggest issue is she has no friends. Every time we meet a new kid and try to help her make a friend she messes it up by wetting her pants and then they no longer wish to play with her. She is so smart and funny but she is also very mean at times witch also doesn't help in the friend area. Has anyone else got the same issue? My step son has Aspergers also but he is the super smart, quiet type my daughter is very loving and outgoing so it is hard for her to not have friends or to understand why the kids she played with yesterday wont call her back or let her come over.

Anonymous said...

Hello my name is jane im 49 and a single parent my eldest daughter has aspergers,ADHD,and dyxpraxia she is sixteen and at college,I have another daughter with severe learning dissabilities i think she might have aspergers but the piadtrician doesnt think so so im still fighting for her shes only 7 it took me 8 years to get my eldest diagnosed and i have had to struggle on my own for years.My eldest daughter with aspergers spends most of her time in her room on her laptop,watching tv,listening to music and singing,the only job I can get her to do is hoover her bedroom she has an enabler to take her out and teach her some social skills like dealing with money and time and she has real trouble with these,ive had two phone debts landline to mobile and mobile to mobile both have been over two hundred i suggested to her and her enabler about trying to find a little job,and also try to do a cv maybe go to connections with enabler she is refusing and wont budge she starts shouting and crying I cant get her to join in with cooking she doesnt like shopping for clothes and its always a battle I have no family to help,a month ago she rang me on way home from college asking if a boy could come and stay in my house i didnt know him he has ADHD she said and has been kicked out of his home they couldnt tell me why he was kicked out so i said no she said if he couldnt come then she wasnt coming home she turned her phone off and i didnt know where she was or if she was safe and i had to involve the police she is now home and safe I feel life is a constant battle and both my daughters have no empathy with each other i have no time for myself i work part time as a cleaner my care manager says theres no funding for any respite im feeling exhausted,and lost i just dont know what to do to make life bearable for us all at home,my eldest daughter does have two special needs clubs to go to but thats the only help i have sorry for the essay just wondered if you had any advice that might be helpfull and am i the only mum to feel like this? I have two daughters and there are times i just feel like someone has given me two daughters to look after and i look at them and just think it doesnt matter what i say or do nothing works its like when im talking theres nobody at home.

Anonymous said...

OK, so how do you balance giving your child life skills to help them through life and the safety of the child and family? Let me set this up. My 8 year old ASP/ADHD son has discovered he loves popcorn. So Saturday morning he gets up early, before the rest of the family, and pops 2 bags of popcorn. When asked why 2 bags, he said "to fill up the bowl"! So Sunday morning he gets up and there is no more microwave popcorn. But he spots some plain popcorn in a bag. He knows it's been popped over a fire before at boy scouts so he applies these principles to our kitchen. He gets out a pot (not the cheap one!) puts dry corn in it and puts on the lid. He puts it in the microwave. (Note, the rest of the family is still asleep in bed!) He microwaves the pot (did I mention it was a REALLY nice pot?!) Begins melting the handle on the pot and not popping so he takes the pot out and places it on the stove, a few pop, most burn. He pulls it off the stove and puts the hot pot directly on the wooden table. The table begins to smoke and burn a black ring through the clear coat! He's still a bit upset he doesn't have the amount of popcorn he wants. Fortunately by this time my husband had roused to let the dogs out and discovered the "experiment" downstairs.

After being prompted by my husband, my DS comes upstairs to "explain" what he did. He did leave out SEVERAL important details, but at least he confessed what happened. He was scared he'd get in trouble. So here's where I would like some direction. I want him to grasp how dangerous that could have been, without scaring him from cooking in the future. I encourage my children to "fend for themselves" when they are hungry and have foods available that are child friendly and easily accessible. My son understands that he is NEVER allowed to use the stove without an adult (though apparently it didn't apply to this case "because I was hungry"!).

Anything similar happen to anyone else?

Anonymous said...

Can you give me some advice on how to explain to someone that my child has Aspergers and not ADHD. My Mother in law chose Christmas day to tell us that she believes the Aspergers diagnosis is incorrect and she is sure he has ADHD. We know it is Aspergers, he has been diagnosed professionally by a child psychologist and has seen many professionals that agree with the diagnosis. I think she almost wants it to be ADHD so he can be given some drug to help him and because the traits she picks up on are similar to those of ADHD - lack of concentration/attention span and appearing hyperactive (although this is only because he finds it stressful to be in the in-laws presence and acts out).

Anonymous said...

I have a teenage daughter that has been diagnosed with Aspergers. She also has ADHD. She also has some other issues as well, we are just finishing up an adoption (her child) from an unplanned pregnancy. We are way late in the game of trying to get her help (I feel), but we seem to be having great difficulty in her being honest with us, especially about homework. (We had some very bad 1st semester grades) I plan to subscribe to your parenting tips online, but with everything she went through should we as parents be looking for a Psychiatrist's help? She is 17 and seems to have no compass for responsibility.

Any advice you can give would be appreciated.

Anonymous said...

I have a 13 year old daughter. Facebook has become the vain of my life. We have to lock all technology equipment in the safe at night just so she doesnt go on facebook. She is so obsessed with trying to be popular. She is continually defiant and when something goes terribly wrong because of an impulse reaction, she cant tell you why she did that in the first place. My husband has not been to any peadiatrician appointments, so I feel he doesnt understand that she is the way she is. It is a constant battle. Every time I deactivate a facebook account she has "darling" friends that make her a new email address and facebook account, then on the sly tell me that "they thought I should know, she has a new facebook". I am always on egg shells. She has snuck out before because some boys asked her to on facebook, and now i find inboxes by an 18 yr old asking her to sneak out. The peadiatrician took her off her medication 8 months ago because she was getting quite anxious on concerta. Since the move her grades have fallen from a 70% average to 30%. Her general behaviour is overwhelming and hard to cope with. I see that Focalin has been mentioned, would it be worth my while to mention this to the Dr? Sorry for the novel...this is the first time I have actually talked outside my peadiatrician appointments.

Becky said...

Yes!!!!! My daughter is 9 and has been aspergers and adhd. She has always been distructive and trashes the house. Its a constant battle.

annmarie said...

my daughter marks very high for ADHD and aspergers she isnt 4 ti the end of july so they wont help me with her ... its a constent battle every day .. my 8yr old son has ADHD and is on meds ... does any one have any tips on how to cope lol

Anonymous said...

My son is 7 with Asp.&adhd
We tried several meds ultimately we found that focolin 3x daily and seroquil helped.
Good luck

Anonymous said...

Same with my son. After several meds we found focolin and seroquel worked. Also he has a social skills group weekly with similar kids

Anonymous said...

My son is now 13 and we have been dealing with his "issues" since he was a difficult baby. One of the hardest parts now is he acts acceptable and sometimes great when his Focalin XR is in his system, but once his 8 hours wears off he is a different person. The initial response by the "authority" suggests long acting stimulants. Well, you can't take them 24/7 if you expect them to sleep or eat. We have had to put him on mood stablilizers just to get through the evenings. By 4pm, my house is in total turmoil and my younger children are horribly affected by his outbursts, language, and violence. He has been in various therpies and tried every ADHD medication listed since he was 6 years old. We are now having to consider boarding school because he is ruining the lives of my 7 and 10 year olds. If anyone has any help, I would gladly try it because I do not want to send my son away-I know he will be terrified. I am planning on trying gluten and casein free in the next couple of weeks as a last ditch effort.

trisha baker said...

My son is 9 with aspergers odd adhd anxiety dexidrine 3 times a day helps

Mrs. Scott said...

I am the mother of twin Boys who will be turning 9 this month. Both boys have been diagnosed with ADHD and aspbergers. They have been on Ritalin and medidate cd and are now on vyvanse. After school let's out they r a handful. One of them has more problems with the hyper activity and doesn't sleep well at night. The other has more of the social problems and non stop talking. even when it gets him in trouble at school. Both of the r very small and a lot of the meds decrease appetite. But they have to take something cuz school sends them home within an hour if they haven't taken meds anyone have any suggestions on meds that work and help keep their weight up?

heather123 said...

my son is 12 and is dagnosed with aspergers/adhd he has been on the same meds for 6 years now its a trial and error process and you cannot give up. He takes focalin xr 30mg and tenex. The tenex seemed to be a boost to help the focalin work. He takes a focalin 5mg after school to help with homework. He takes a sleeping pill at night to help him sleep. He is the best kid ever on these medications. It took us a year to get them lined out but after that it has been wonderful. Keep trying and dont give up mention tenex with the focalin or another stimulant. Dont give up and be patient. It takes time but the ending is great. Of course he still has minor issues but nothing I cant deal with. Hope this helps! Thanks :)

Tracy Stoker said...

I am totallly broken my ds who is 10 was diagnosed with adhd at age 5, we're currently on equasym xl 30mg, but school life is getting worse. He is being tested for aspergers now and today has been the day from hell, he got excluded from school for hurting someone. I am lost and broken and can't see any light at the end of the very long tunnel :(4

Pamela Fowler said...

Tracy Don't give up hope. Having him diagnosed by a neuropsychologist is a first step since many are misdiagnosed. I'd look for a group therapy to help with behavior & social issues. A local aspergers/adhd support group for parents. Pray this helps. Pam

Stargazer7176 said...

I am in the same boat as you. My son is 7 almost 8. When he is not on his ADHD meds he can have violent outbursts . We have him on a 12 hour concerta which works wonderful while he is on it. We also have him on guanfacine which helps with his excessive talking and noise making. Recently we discovered he wasn't sleeping well. He was waking up on his floor in the den and in backwards in his bed. They put him on trasadone which I think has made a huge difference. We also she his therapist every other week and he tells me that his sessions are classified. Make me laugh and drives me nuts all at the same time. We are very strict with jake and his behavior. He gets grounded when he misbehaves. We talk to him and try not to let him use his issues (powers) as an excuse. We have explained to him that every supper hero who discovers their powers has difficulties until they learn to control it. It's the same with him. He has to learn how to control his issues and then they will become a gift. Many famous people have had Aspergers, their brains act differently which allows them to see things differently then everyone else. We also have him in diving which he does very well and and loves. It gives him something he is successful in. Find her nitch, try sports, cooking, music, ect. We are also training a lab puppy we rescued from a shelter to be a therapy dog for him. To give him a friend. We still have our impossible days and I think there is no hope. But keep taking it one day at a time. Look for support groups. Email me at stargazer7176@msn.com if you need to talk. Hang in there!

Debbie said...

Go to a naturopath. Get a stool test for parasites, candida and bacteria. While waiting for the results eliminate ALL gluten and lactose. If you don't se results in 10 days, eliminate all dairy. If you don't see results in 7 more days eliminate all grains. By then your test results will be back and ND will have supplements to recommend. The gut is RELATED to our brains. Here is a reason so many schizophrenics have celiac disease! If you can't afford the ND at least do the diet until you can afford it.

mich said...

My son is 14. He has Aspergers with Tourettes and ADHD. He is oppositional and impulsive. He loves to cuss and say inappropriate sexual things. He is loud and obnoxious and just loves to irritate everyone at home. At school he sometimes tests them but doesn't want to get into trouble. Although he does refuse school sometimes claiming illness. He is slow to do and turn things in. Organization is difficult. They have him on Risperdal for anger and meltdowns, intuniv for tics and attention, strattera for attention and anxiety and Prozac for moods and depression. However his impulse is still impossible at home and he is causing a lot of trouble with his fussing and sex talk. We are talking about adding concerta to the mix. I am worried about tics and mania. Any comments. He is at the maximum doses of the meds he is on now. The dr considered upping strattera but it will be on a dose for a higher weight person. Any suggestions?

Mom who Understands!!! said...

Wow, your son sounds exactly like mine. First off, no offense, but I think a lot of his behaviors could be coming from all of the mixed meds. That combo is enough to drive someone nuts!!!! We tried Risperadole and OMG, what a nightmare drug!!! I would get him involved in a soccer program or sport that he likes...local YMCA is great!!! Try weening him off some of that not upping it!!! Trust me aspie kids respond very differently to meds!!!

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the Aspergers child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

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How to Prevent Meltdowns in Aspergers Children

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and the Asperger’s child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

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Parenting Defiant Aspergers Teens

Although Aspergers is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager with Aspergers are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the Aspergers teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

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Aspergers Children “Block-Out” Their Emotions

Parenting children with Aspergers and HFA can be a daunting task. In layman’s terms, Aspergers is a developmental disability that affects the way children develop and understand the world around them, and is directly linked to their senses and sensory processing. This means they often use certain behaviors to block out their emotions or response to pain.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children With Aspergers Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with Aspergers face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

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Living with an Aspergers Spouse/Partner

Research reveals that the divorce rate for people with Aspergers is around 80%. Why so high!? The answer may be found in how the symptoms of Aspergers affect intimate relationships. People with Aspergers often find it difficult to understand others and express themselves. They may seem to lose interest in people over time, appear aloof, and are often mistaken as self-centered, vain individuals.

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Online Parent Coaching for Parents of Asperger's Children

If you’re the parent of a child with Aspergers or High-Functioning Autism, you know it can be a struggle from time to time. Your child may be experiencing: obsessive routines; problems coping in social situations; intense tantrums and meltdowns; over-sensitivity to sounds, tastes, smells and sights; preoccupation with one subject of interest; and being overwhelmed by even the smallest of changes.

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Unraveling The Mystery Behind Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism

Parents, teachers, and the general public have a lot of misconceptions of Asperger's and High-Functioning Autism. Many myths abound, and the lack of knowledge is both disturbing and harmful to kids and teens who struggle with the disorder.

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Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

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My Aspergers Child - Syndicated Content