HELP FOR PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ASPERGER'S & HIGH-FUNCTIONING AUTISM

Education and Counseling for Individuals Affected by Autism Spectrum Disorders

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Tics in Your Teen on the Spectrum

"I'm 16 years old and I have ASD [level 1]. My parents and my friends tell me that I'm always blinking my eyes. Does everybody with autism have tics? What causes it? What can I do to stop it?"

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8 comments:

twinsmom said...

My son in times of stress or transition twists his hair, started with one hand, and now it is both hands twisting vigorously on both sides of his head. When asked to stop this he can concentrate on that and stop, but only breifly. Something else we have noticed is that my son more recently will flip upside down on the couch, again in times of stress or when transitioning occurs. I asked him why he does this and he simply says "it makes me feel better". Is this a coping mechanism and why would it only recently develop? Is he more stressed than usual and has just found something that helps? Why would that help?

Unknown said...

Need help anyone. ..my son has aspergers syndrome and ocd. He has been on high honor roll and has had 4.0 since his Freshman year. He is now 18 and a few months ago he was diagnosed with a complex tic disorder that is closely related to tourettes. The school has put him in the special ed classroom when he has been in regular classes his whole school career minus math. The doctors have told the school that he can be b placed back in regular classes but they have still yet to do so. His compulsions involves a strenuous back arching stretch WHENEVER he goes to sit down. He also has vocal tics. His movement specialist has instructed us to ignore them. His therapist has instructed us that it is okay to Assist him to work through the compulsions. This is breaking my heart to watch and not to know exactly what Avenue to take. If ANYONE has any information please feel free to contact me through text first its 217 617 0130

Anonymous said...

Hello, My name is Jacob A. Samuel and I am 15 years old. I have Aspergers. Many of my "tics" ,as you call them, include head twitching, rolling of the eyes, and breathing heavily. Many of my friends are starting to notice the head twitching. They call me out and ask why am I tilting my head, it's embarrassing and now I have information on how to control it.

Unknown said...

I have a 12 year old son that has aspergers and he has motor tics and vocal.he started when he was around 9 and its getting worse.his psychologist says it should go away but it seems like it's getting worse.if you have ways of controlling it I would be very grateful if you could tell me.I'm very concerned about this happening to my son.you can e-mail me at booboo22465@ gmail.com and put controlling tics in the subject thanks.

Unknown said...

Im also 16 with aspergers and yes i do have tics. Mine are nail picking, itching,lip picking. Mine are usally brought on by stress other times it's random it maay go away by itself or not nobody knows

Unknown said...

My son is 7 and just developed tics.Blinking of eyes and what we call fishy lips.I don't know if it's anxiety or a side effect of a new med. I asked his dr. to discontinue the new med aderol. He was referred to a new school that would be better for his autism and it seems to be more stressful for him. Please feel free to contact me,please text first.520 419 5892

Unknown said...

Aren't tics part of tourettes syndrome?

Unknown said...

Aren't tics part of Tourette's syndrome?

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the ASD child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

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How to Prevent Meltdowns in Children on the Spectrum

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's or HFA child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and your child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

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Parenting Defiant Teens on the Spectrum

Although Aspergers [high-functioning autism] is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager on the spectrum are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children with ASD Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with ASD face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

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Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

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to read the full article...

Highly Effective Research-Based Parenting Strategies for Children with Asperger's and HFA

Become an expert in helping your child cope with his or her “out-of-control” emotions, inability to make and keep friends, stress, anger, thinking errors, and resistance to change.

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My Aspergers Child - Syndicated Content