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Behavior Modification Plan for Your Aspergers or HFA Child

A short-term behavior modification plan can break through a cycle of bad behavior in your Aspergers (AS) or High-Functioning Autistic (HFA) youngster. Think of it as a learning tool to help him move forward to a new level of social development. Four to six weeks on the plan is usually enough to change one or two specific behavior problems. At the very least, your youngster will have a clear understanding of your expectations for his behavior, even if he is not yet able to consistently maintain the desirable behavior.

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7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Superb blog post, I have book marked this internet site so ideally I’ll see much more on this subject in the foreseeable future!

Anonymous said...

Hi,
A lot of these newsletters are aimed at modifying young childrens behaviour. What about young teenagers, charts & stars dont 'cut it'? There doesnt seem to be many ideas for older children, does this mean at 14 years old its too late? I imagine that many mothers like myself would refuse to believe that and try the best we can, but a little help for this age group would be REALLY appreciated. Thanks

Mark said...

For teens, you will want to use the suggestions here: http://www.myoutofcontrolteen.com/DefiantAspergersTeen (you may have to cut and paste the URL into your browser).

Anonymous said...

Our son was just diagnosed with
Aspergers last week. I found your blog and you have no idea how much it has helped me understand things better. We will be starting the chip system with him today. Thank you for such a common sense approach.

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for this post. It has shown me a way that i can see will be very effective with my son. Being only diagnosed a few days ago, but knowing the issue for a while, behaviour has been a huge problem and i can see the light will show very soon in our right now dark tunnel.

Anonymous said...

I really liked the article, and the very cool blog

Anonymous said...

Hi everyone,

I am hoping that someone can help me with some ideas for my son who was recently diagnosed with Aspergers. We seem to be having trouble with him being able to focus and keep his hands to himself while he is at football practice. We have recently started a behavior modification chart for him yesterday. It appeared that the chart worked somewhat, but I am wondering if there is any advice from others that have gone through a similar situation. I am think of writing up a social story for him, but have never done that before. Any suggestions or tips would be greatly accepted. Thank you in advance for your help.

My child has been rejected by his peers, ridiculed and bullied !!!

Social rejection has devastating effects in many areas of functioning. Because the ASD child tends to internalize how others treat him, rejection damages self-esteem and often causes anxiety and depression. As the child feels worse about himself and becomes more anxious and depressed – he performs worse, socially and intellectually.

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How to Prevent Meltdowns in Children on the Spectrum

Meltdowns are not a pretty sight. They are somewhat like overblown temper tantrums, but unlike tantrums, meltdowns can last anywhere from ten minutes to over an hour. When it starts, the Asperger's or HFA child is totally out-of-control. When it ends, both you and your child are totally exhausted. But... don’t breathe a sigh of relief yet. At the least provocation, for the remainder of that day -- and sometimes into the next - the meltdown can return in full force.

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Parenting Defiant Teens on the Spectrum

Although Aspergers [high-functioning autism] is at the milder end of the autism spectrum, the challenges parents face when disciplining a teenager on the spectrum are more difficult than they would be with an average teen. Complicated by defiant behavior, the teen is at risk for even greater difficulties on multiple levels – unless the parents’ disciplinary techniques are tailored to their child's special needs.

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Older Teens and Young Adult Children with ASD Still Living At Home

Your older teenager or young “adult child” isn’t sure what to do, and he is asking you for money every few days. How do you cut the purse strings and teach him to be independent? Parents of teens with ASD face many problems that other parents do not. Time is running out for teaching their adolescent how to become an independent adult. As one mother put it, "There's so little time, yet so much left to do."

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Parenting Children and Teens with High-Functioning Autism

Two traits often found in kids with High-Functioning Autism are “mind-blindness” (i.e., the inability to predict the beliefs and intentions of others) and “alexithymia” (i.e., the inability to identify and interpret emotional signals in others). These two traits reduce the youngster’s ability to empathize with peers. As a result, he or she may be perceived by adults and other children as selfish, insensitive and uncaring.

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Highly Effective Research-Based Parenting Strategies for Children with Asperger's and HFA

Become an expert in helping your child cope with his or her “out-of-control” emotions, inability to make and keep friends, stress, anger, thinking errors, and resistance to change.

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My Aspergers Child - Syndicated Content